Posts Tagged '3d-plastic'

T1-MMT-P2-p2-e1 Straight wrapping with threads

Wrapping is a fascinating process. It’s one of those repetitive processes quite common in textiles, where the hands are occupied but most of the mind is free to wander. It can enhance a shape, or change it, or hide it. It can join materials or objects, can take advantage of their properties, extend or adapt them (think of pillows and tea-cosies). It can protect, comfort (a hug) or bind, suffocate.

Sample p2-37
As suggested in the course notes I started with a kitchen wooden spoon, and wound rug wool evenly around it.

Sample p2-37

Sample p2-37

Sample p2-37 detail

Sample p2-37 detail

The wool changes the colour and texture, but the shape is unmistakable. The wrapping is like a textured coat of paint. The dip of the bowl is lost, and the tip isn’t covered neatly – I think glue would be needed for that. It doesn’t really fire the imagination … although it does make me more conscious of the shape, rather than taking it for granted and dismissing it. It’s not quite so familiar any more.

 
Sample p2-38

Sample p2-38

Sample p2-38

The same yarn, but I wanted to expose the spoon as well – the worn, washed wood.

Any mystery is gone. The wrapping looks brash, random, careless. The wool doesn’t speak to or enhance the wood. Perhaps a kitchen twine would have been better here.
 
Sample p2-39

Sample p2-39

Sample p2-39

With this sample I wanted to change the apparent shape. The result is too obvious as an addition.  The lump of wrapping is alien, imposed. It looks like a gall on a branch, a sign of disease or intruders.
 
Sample p2-40

Sample p2-40

Sample p2-40

The black elastic bands were placed as supports for the next sample, but I liked the effect and wanted to capture it. There’s also the pun on “measuring spoon”, which pleases me (at one point I had the bands lined up at 2 cm intervals, although clearly there was shifting).
 
Sample p2-41

Sample p2-41

Sample p2-41

Sample p2-41 b

Sample p2-41 b


Here the elastic bands have been used to anchor some stiff plastic threads – they are like artificial horsehair, which I have cut into shorter lengths.

The bristles of the ends create a wonderful dynamic effect. The spoon isn’t disguised at all, but it is transformed.

Version b has just a bit more added, trying to push the 3D aspect of the result.

I think this sample is a simple but very effective use of wrapping. The almost monochromatic colour brings unity to the combination of materials. There is a dynamic presence claiming space around the spoon, and also a sense of honesty – the constituent materials declare themselves without disguise or false modesty.
 
Sample p2-42

Sample p2-42 detail

Sample p2-42 detail


Sample p2-42

Sample p2-42

In the previous sample I was trying to stay clean and linear, but noticed the tendency of individual strands to separate. In sample p2-42 I played up that effect, introducing a lot more interest and detail.

The shape of the spoon is de-emphasized, although there is something about the mixture of curved and straight black lines that links back to it. The spoon has become a vehicle for exuberant three-dimensional drawing.

I think there are lots of possibilities to explore here. Using a variety of different-but-related base shapes which together form a larger composition could be interesting.
 
Sample p2-43

Sample p2-43

Sample p2-43

This sample continues the idea of black lines partially obscuring the spoon – but “partial” much more complete. It’s another outing for the black fibreglass insect screening.

It takes quite a bit more effort to discern the spoon within, but it can still be seen in its entirety. The overall shape has been changed and is now wider at the handle end. I was hoping to get more from the layering of the mesh, but the result is more even, contained, and dull than expected.
 
Sample p2-44

Sample p2-44

Sample p2-44

Stripping some strands from the the edges, wrapping more loosely, with twisting to create more layers, has resulted in a much more interesting wrapping. The wrapping is the star with the spoon almost irrelevant.
 
Sample p2-45
Sample p2-45

Sample p2-45

Wrapping more closely, the spoon is enhanced rather than overwhelmed. The twisted, layered, fringed screening creates interest and variety, acting in partnership with the spoon. It’s almost like the wardrobe staple “little black dress”, a glamorous presentation of the previously humble.
 
Sample p2-46
Sample p2-46

Sample p2-46

Here the mesh becomes a container for the spoon. Some volume is created, but in the end it is just a spoon.
 
Sample p2-47
Sample p2-47

Sample p2-47

Shredded silver paper has been used to wrap loosely around the spoon. Tighter wrapping around part of the handle reflects the shape, but changing tension at the end confuses – which side is the bowl? The answer is clearer in the photograph than in real life.
 
Sample p2-48
Sample p2-48

Sample p2-48


Sample p2-48 detail

Sample p2-48 detail

Looser wrapping overall disguises the spoon more completely, but glimpses are still available.

I like the idea of hidden strength and form. This is almost all, but not entirely, about the wrapping material. Its erratic behaviour is just a little controlled by the interior spoon. There is a slight tension between form and chaos, between hard and soft, which gives interest.
 
Sample p2-49

Sample p2-49

Sample p2-49

Sample p2-47 has been repeated in an exaggerated way. The silver paper appears more controlled, managed, while the spoon is even less relevant.
 
Sample p2-50
Sample p2-50

Sample p2-50

An extra layer of wrapping using insect mesh has been added. Knowing there is a spoon inside I can distinguish the shape, but really it could be anything or nothing. The spoon is just armature.
 
Sample p2-51
Sample p2-51

Sample p2-51

Allowing the paper to “escape” the exterior wrapping brings a sparkle and interest back to the package. The underlying form of the spoon is much more apparent as well – obscured but not lost within.

There is almost a sense of a captured moment. Something is being revealed or is bursting out. Can it be contained? What more will be revealed? Each element – spoon, paper and mesh – plays a part in the ongoing story.
 
Sample p2-52

Sample p2-52

Sample p2-52

Further exploring layers of wrapping, here the spoon is closely wrapped in orange tissue paper, loosely encircled in silver shreds, then nestled in insect mesh. When preparing this I thought a of baby bundled into a pram, warm, protected, virtually invisible.

The result in my eyes is surprisingly static.
 
Sample p2-53

Sample p2-53

Sample p2-53


Extended Join Sample

Extended Join Sample

By this stage it may be apparent that I was dismantling the extended sample from the previous project while working on this exercise. Paper-clip chains, previously suspenders, are now wrapped around the spoon.

Dull.

Almost interesting, I feel it should be interesting, but dull. The individual paper-clips aren’t exactly aligned, but they aren’t greatly varied. Density of wrapping isn’t consistent – but it isn’t particularly anything. The paper-clips and spoon just sit there, not giving anything to each other.

I tried to find a variation that worked, but the paper-clips had an odd mixture of rigidity and movement that resisted. They wouldn’t fall loosely. They reacted to the spoon’s varying shape as if they resented it.
 
Sample p2-54

Sample p2-54

Sample p2-54

Adding an intervening layer of mesh helped a little. The clips are seen as a chain, wrapping.

In the photograph there is a feeling of the spoon entrapped, imprisoned. It was less apparent while working with the materials and I didn’t explore this.
 
Sample p2-55

Sample p2-55

Sample p2-55

Instead I made some small changes to break up the exterior lines and tried suspending and back-lighting.

It looks a little like a stealth jet, or a revealing x-ray. A series could be interesting, individual items that you have to decipher that build into a whole. The kitchen link makes me think of 1950s housewives, chained to their domestic duties. My mother? Could I show house and children dragging and chaining, a gradual lightening and emergence in her own right?
 
Sample p2-56

Sample p2-56

Sample p2-56

Colour!

Bundles of mixed yarns have been used for wrapping. The spoon has returned, there is some nice zigzag movement on the handle, but the bowl wrapping is just a mess.

I like the return to colour and to fibre, but this is clumsy.
 
Sample p2-57

Sample p2-57

Sample p2-57


Sample p2-57 detail

Sample p2-57 detail

The same materials are wrapped in a more co-ordinated and controlled way. The result is great. The colours and textures sing together. The spoon is clearly there, but sheathed beautifully.

Tachi fittings

Tachi fittings

Just last night, days after I’d worked on this exercise, I saw this at the Art Gallery of NSW. Part of the Colin McDonald collection, this is a detail of a piece described as “Tachi (long sword worn with cutting edge down) with fittings decorated with dragons amongst the clouds and itomaki-tachi-goshirae style mount. 1390”. The whole piece was exquisite. I couldn’t figure out how this section of wrapping was worked, but the crossing structure was used on a number of the items on display – presumably none original, but I don’t know.

It feels ridiculous to link my spoon with a beautiful, highly crafted, lethal weapon, but it suggests a path to investigate.

 
Sample p2-58

Sample p2-58 a

Sample p2-58 a


Wrapping in plastic filament using the 3D pen – a nod to spun sugar.

On this first attempt I kept a bit loose and open, wondering if I would need to break the plastic to remove it from the spoon. The spiral turned out to be very flexible, and it was easy to manipulate off the bowl and then slide away.

Sample p2-58 b

Sample p2-58 b


The second attempt followed the spoon shape more closely, and resulted in a more dynamic line.

I like the wrapping, but even more I like the wrapping with the original gone. You could take the line of an imprint of what is now lost, or be lighter and see it as a quirky representation.

Shi Jindian’s Beijing Jeep’s Shadow (2007)

Shi Jindian Beijing Jeep’s Shadow (2007)

It reminds me of Shi Jindian Beijing Jeep’s Shadow, seen at the White Rabbit gallery (9-November-2012)Described as crochet in wire, the form of an entire jeep has been captured in wire lace.

This could be a very interesting and rewarding path to follow with plastic. A later Part of this module is on Molding and Casting, and there may be an opportunity in that to take this further.

Sample p2-58 combination

Sample p2-58 combination

I played with different layouts of wrappings and spoon. This one shows the flexibility of the spiral. It’s rather nice to see its genesis and continued development into something quite different.

T1-MMT-P2-p2-e1 Straight wrapping with threads
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 2: Joining and wrapping
Project 2: Wrapping
Exercise 1: Straight wrapping with threads

T1-MMT-P2-p1-e2 Joining straight edges with a gap – post 1

Rather than following the precise sequence suggested in the course notes, I’ve started this exercise by thinking of clusters and similarities in joins. My start-the-session sketching was reminding myself of works where the join with a gap is very loose, responding (or not) to gravity, the join itself a major feature.

Colour pencils on A3 cartridge paper

Colour pencils on A3 cartridge paper

All the works drawn are on my pinterest page (link). Clockwise from top left, artists and direct links:

  • Alicia Scardetta Melted (2014, http://ascardetta.com/new-work). I love the exuberant colour and fall of the wrapped wefts, contained within a traditional weaving format.
  • Eva Hesse Metronomic Irregularity I (1966, a href=”https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/eva_hesse.php?i=1701″>https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/eva_hesse.php?i=1701). The relative sizes of board and gap is wrong. This work defies gravity, with the tangle of lines the result of the nature of the material.
  • Paula do Prado Almas Gemelas/Twin Souls (http://www.pauladoprado.net/twin-souls.html. This is a conceptually based work, considering issues such as identity. While experimenting with materials and techniques I don’t want to lose sight of meaning, here people joined yet individual.
  • Diem Chau Sisters (http://www.diemchau.com/plates24.html). I saw this artist’s work on the OCA pinterest site (https://www.pinterest.com/opencollegearts/textiles/). As well as the conceptual join, this work uses a glued join of organza to ceramic which is very effective. More on Diem Chau’s technique on her blog http://tinyhaus.blogspot.com.au/2010/03/embroidery-faq-part-1.html
  • Michele Elliot hemispheres, drawn to you, still (2011, http://rmitgallery.com/2012/02/10/behind-the-scenes-of-sensorial-loop/). This work accepts – uses – gravity, but with a level of control and order also imposed. It is materials and process led, recreated at each venue of a travelling exhibition.
  • Sample p2-6

    Sample p2-6 In progress

    Sample p2-6 In progress

    My first sample is similar in layout to Hesse’s work, but I decided to push the exuberance with colour. The material being joined is a plastic latchhook canvas, with the joining “threads” plastic drawn with the 3D pen. Both these materials are fairly rigid – one of my sub-thoughts is the mix of rigid and soft materials, and the impact of the combination in a join.

    Sample p2-6 Top view

    Sample p2-6 Top view


    The result has energy and colour. I photographed it flat on the table, but also tried pinning it on the wall and it protruded and defied gravity in a pleasing way.

    Sample p2-6 Detail view

    Sample p2-6 Detail view


    There is too much detail and I don’t know where to look. I’d like to try for a better balance with some control or constraint. Looking back, Hesse’s work has the subtle grid of the boards and the clear divisions of boards and gap providing a structure and sense of order. My grid is effectively invisible against the white background, and simply colouring it probably wouldn’t help – I think it is too coarse and would only become yet more lines.

    I didn’t intend the blobby attachment areas and have thought of a few ways to avoid them, but decided I quite like a bit of solidity or density with all those fine lines.

    The comments above were written when first looking at and photographing the result. The sample had too much information, too much complexity, nowhere to rest the eyes. I found it difficult.

    Sample p2-6 Side view

    Sample p2-6 Side view

    A few hours later, writing this post, I see it differently. Pottering around the workroom the blobby attachment areas become the focus, with the lines above a lacework that changes in colour and shape as I move around. Static, there is too much and I can see nothing. Moving around, the base provides stability and interest with a haze of colour constantly shifting above. The result is bright, cheerful, lively, and the colour haze fascinating. I would like to find ways to reproduce that on different scales, and in a more permanent way. Unfortunately the actual join is light and brittle, and I’m sure with a sharp pull I could separated the two parts.

    Sample p2-7
    Wanting to make a feature of gravity, next I made three bundles of rayon machine embroidery threads, each bundle a different length. I used them together with thumbtacks to join two pieces of acrylic felt acoustic panel – a soft join between two rigid materials.

    Sample p2-7a Straight join

    Sample p2-7a Straight join


    A simple straight join shows the thread more lively than I anticipated.

    Sample p2-7b Lower panel suspended

    Sample p2-7b Lower panel suspended


    The lower panel is supported only by the threads.

    Sample p2-7c angles panels

    Sample p2-7c angles panels


    Angled panels and wider spacing looks like an ineffective trouser closing.

    Sample p2-7c Detail

    Sample p2-7c Detail


    On closer look I am beginning to appreciate the liveliness of the threads.

    Sample p2-7d Another uneven join

    Sample p2-7d Another uneven join


    Another uneven join looks like a bizarre clown smile in the cropped photo. The three bundles are much more integrated here, creating a field of movement.

    Sample p2-7e Intertwined

    Sample p2-7e Intertwined


    Some interaction, with the bundles crossing. It loses the individuality of the threads, getting more the smooth stream that I envisaged at the beginning. I like the geometry that’s beginning to appear.

    Sample p2-7f Offset

    Sample p2-7f Offset


    Offset. The threads create lovely fluid shapes.

    Sample p2-7g Plait - showing dimensionality

    Sample p2-7g Plait – showing dimensionality


    This started as a plait. The photograph was taken at an angle to capture the dimensional effect that is appearing.

    There are lots of possibilities still to be explored here. I would like to try at a larger scale – number of threads, number of bundles, possibly size of thread (20/2 silk could make a beautiful show).

    T1-MMT-P2-p1-e2 Joining straight edges with a gap – post 1
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 2: Joining and wrapping
    Project 1: Joining
    Exercise 2: Joining straight edges with a gap

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project overview

    Some background: there was a period at the beginning of the year when I was between OCA courses, waiting for the new Mixed Media for Textiles (MMT) to be finalised. I had a high level outline and draft reading list, so I started reading and experimenting. In early March I took an evening class in 3D printing, with the idea it was bound to be useful in MMT at some point. I’ve continued experimentation based on that class, often closely entwined with the MMT exercises. Eventually I decided there was sufficient mass and relevance to present it as an extension project.

    Referring back to the course Introduction to this Part:

  • I’ve used a range of ways to manipulate materials new to me to discover their creative potential.
  • I’ve expanded my knowledge and understanding of them, and have further ideas.
  • I’ve used the same working practices as with the formal exercises.
  • It’s not precisely surface distortion, where a previously flat surface is distorted. Instead with 3D printing I can directly create a distorted surface. As it happens this fits rather well with my textile interests, where I focus on creating fabrics with weaving and felting.

    I’ve even been able to extend (!) sketchbook work, drawing with a 3D pen.

    To see all blog posts which relate to this extension click here.

    Some samples with particular interest or potential:

    Sample p1-38

    Sample p1-38

    fuse_plastic_47Sample p1-38 (10-April) was in a sense a sketch exploring the contours of a crumpled paper exercise by tracing with a 3D pen.
    The resulting network of lines could be regarded as a new distorted surface, although a discontinuous one. sketch20150514-03In later sketchbook work I made a tracing of a different sample, then attempted to create a skin using rice paper. (16-May) The result for the plastic wasn’t exciting, but the paper cast had potential.

    Sidetrack p1-1 Result

    Sidetrack p1-1 Result

    My sample numbering system has fallen apart with the late addition of this extension. Not wanting to go back and renumber everything, “sidetrack p1-1” shows the control gained using kinetic sand as a mould. Again it could be argued that the bowl that results is not strictly a surface, however I think the human eye and mind will read it as such. There is a lot of potential here for both creating and embellishing distorted surfaces, although attachment to other materials remains a challenge.

    Sidetrack p1-3 Sideview

    Sidetrack p1-3 Sideview

    Sidetrack p1-3 (16-April) is more solid and introduces colour variety. There is definite potential here, although a thinner sample when tested proved quite brittle and broke up under only mild pressure.

    Polymorph plastic is a very exciting material. It worked well with embossing (one of the formal exercises I didn’t attempt), although printing from the result didn’t go entirely smoothly.

    Sidetrack p1-13 Ribs

    Sidetrack p1-13 Ribs

    Sidetrack p1-13 (21-April) shows a version of linear accordion pleats (project 1, exercise 1) created from plastic pellets. This sample also shows the strong colour than can be achieved using disperse dyes on the plastic.

    In a different sample adding glittery inclusions to the polymorph plastic also worked well. I ended that day’s work session with a list of more experiments I would like to make.

    Sample p1-130c

    Sample p1-130c

    3D software provides another way to create distorted surfaces. In sample p1-130 (9-May) the surface is virtual, but there is the potential to develop it and print it out as an object for its own sake, or as a mould to create further shapes in other materials.

    Sample p1-131dSample p1-131eNot all the virtual samples could be printed into physical form. Sample p131 views d and e would be challenging to produce. They do suggest possibilities in concealing and revealing meaning. Could one create a “forest” that reveals a text as you walk around it?

    Sample p1-132e

    Sample p1-132e

    Sample p1-132e (9-May) is pure fantasy – I don’t believe it could be printed and hold together as an object. It was created by a series of distortions of a plain virtual cube, to me a clear extension of the surface distortions of the course exercises.

    "Sketch" Photo 6

    “Sketch” Photo 6

    A final example of the potential available. This sample was included in a post on sketchbook work (16-May) and combines both polymorph plastic and drawing with the 3D pen. The base shape was formed from a flattened piece of melted plastic, and in terms of basic process is close to the crumpled paper exercises in project 1. There was very good adherence of the two forms of plastic. I wasn’t able to separate them in later manipulations.

    3dplastic_15There is a gap in what I am able to show here – a sample actually produced on a 3D printer. The one experiment I have, combining a lithophane drawing with felting (6-April), is an example of what not to do. The combination of materials and processes I chose whas not successful and there are no direct potential next steps from this. I remain convinced of the basic potential of combining 3D printing with textiles – but this particular attempt is a dead end.

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project overview
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 1: Surface Distortion
    Project 6: Personal extension

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project: Autodesk 123D design

    Meshmaker (see 9-May-2015) seemed a good place to introduce computer-based design because it feels flexible and responds so directly to input. The various brushes and other tools are grouped under “Sculpt”.

    Autodesk 123D design (free download http://www.123dapp.com/design) feels more engineering like.

    Sample p1-133
    I started with some simple text – two dimensional.

    Sample p1-133a

    Sample p1-133a


    Next the text was selected, copied and pasted, and the new 2D text was moved above the original text.
    Sample p1-133b

    Sample p1-133b


    In the centre I’ve circled in red the controls that came up when moving – arrows allow me to move the text on x, y or z axis (which could be described as left/right, forward/back, up/down). There are also circular controls for tilting. Circled on the right is a place to type in the value you want – the precision I was talking about. On the left I’ve put an arrow to show where I’ve moved the new text upwards.

    Didn’t go as planned.
    Sample p1-133c

    Sample p1-133c


    Above I used extrude to go from 2 to 3 dimensions – but not the way I had in my mind.

    Sample p1-134
    Simpler solid shapes – a cube, and a cone that I have rotated.

    Sample p1-134a

    Sample p1-134a


    I used the Loft tool to join them together.
    Sample p1-134b

    Sample p1-134b


    I undid the Loft and sketched a new enclosed shape with Spline.
    Sample p1-134c

    Sample p1-134c


    Didn’t go as planned.

    Sample p1-135
    I have no clear idea of how I produced this. A range of new videos watched, walking away in frustration now and then, a cube swept along a spline curve, a corner tweaked, a boolean merge with a rectangular prism, and another edge (or possible vertex) tweaked. At least I now have an irregular, non-standard solid.

    Sample p1-135a

    Sample p1-135a


    Sample p1-135b

    Sample p1-135b


    Sample p1-135c

    Sample p1-135c


    I suspect this could almost be printed – although that lovely slit window thing would probably be a snag. Still, I have achieved a Something.
    Views a – c above are the same solid from different directions. View d below:
    Sample p1-135d

    Sample p1-135d


    A circular pattern of Somethings!
    Sample p1-135e

    Sample p1-135e


    Another perspective.
    Next turned upside down, lots of little tweaks, and a change of materials.
    Sample p1-135f

    Sample p1-135f


    I save in STL file format and opened it in Meshmixer.
    Sample p1-135g

    Sample p1-135g


    Wow! That looks different.
    But I haven’t been able to edit it. I think I’ll have to start simpler – another day.

    Overall I haven’t got as far as I’d hoped with this. Remembering my early days in other software – say when learning Gimp – I think I’ve made an OK start. No need to focus on the long road ahead 🙂

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project: Autodesk 123D design
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 1: Surface Distortion
    Project 6: Personal extension: Autodesk 123D design

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project: 3D design and printing

    Throughout this Part of the course I’ve been doing little explorations with 3D printing, “drawing” and polymorph plastic. To me they all fit into Mixed Media and into Surface Distortion. Exploring some 3D design software reinforces this. It challenges me to think in three dimensions, to explore space. It could generate ideas that could be developed in many ways (like any sketchbook). The results may be able to be printed off and then incorporated directly in work or used as a mould.

    The first software I’m working in is Meshmaker (free download from http://www.123dapp.com/meshmixer). With a couple of classes with MadMat and a few youtube tutorials under my belt, time to explore.

    Sample p1-130
    I started with a flat Plane, and used an Inflate brush to create some ridge lines. The response reminded me strongly of the earlier work with crumpled paper.

    Sample p1-130a

    Sample p1-130a


    I can change viewpoint to see the result from different angles.
    Sample p1-130b

    Sample p1-130b


    It’s bigger on my screen – some detail has been lost creating the screenshot.
    I can zoom in.
    Sample p1-130c

    Sample p1-130c


    View c shows the triangles which make up the surface. More triangles will be added (like more creasing of the paper) if needed as the shape is pulled around, or if I add them with the Refine brush.
    I can remove extraneous details of printbed, grid and faceting.
    Sample p1-130d

    Sample p1-130d


    Adding colour makes it a bit clearer.
    Sample p1-130e

    Sample p1-130e


    You can see how shadows change as I view the object from different heights and directions.

    I crashed the program.

    Sample p1-130f

    Sample p1-130f


    Which had auto-saved my lovely edge distortions! I still haven’t figured out how to get holes in the fabric.

    The experimentation with different brushes and associated parameters got a little out of hand.

    Sample p1-130g

    Sample p1-130g


    Sample p1-130h

    Sample p1-130h

    Some strange, diseased coral perhaps.

    Sample p1-131
    I started with a simple cylinder solid, which I shaded with a brassy looking finish, just because I discovered how to.

    Sample p1-131a

    Sample p1-131a

    Made it hollow and generated some holes. (Now I’d stopped trying!)

    Sample p1-131b

    Sample p1-131b

    Cut off the top.

    Sample p1-131c

    Sample p1-131c

    Next I tried to emboss some writing (embossing is another of the standard exercises)…

    Sample p1-131d

    Sample p1-131d

    … and on changing view discovered things aren’t always as they seem!

    Sample p1-131e

    Sample p1-131e

    Some quick un-do’s, and another attempt.

    Sample p1-131f

    Sample p1-131f


    Better???

    Another go and it’s more what I originally planned…

    Sample p1-131g

    Sample p1-131g


    … and rather boring in comparison to the earlier surprises.

    Sample p1-131h

    Sample p1-131h


    A wobbly handle completes a dysfunctional mug.

    Sample p1-132

    Sample p1-132a

    Sample p1-132a


    A fresh start with a simple solid.
    Proportions are changed, and a mesh of tubes subtracted to create an open grid structure.
    Sample p1-132b

    Sample p1-132b


    The top surface is dragged in a spiral.
    Sample p1-132c

    Sample p1-132c


    I like the view from other angles – below and the side.
    Sample p1-132d

    Sample p1-132d


    I have an ongoing fascination with boundaries, the juxtaposition of order and chaos, the accommodations made at transition points.
    Wanting to make more dramatic and dimensional changes, I used the Volume, Spike brush with a large size.
    Sample p1-132e

    Sample p1-132e


    Sample p1-132f

    Sample p1-132f


    Sample p1-132g

    Sample p1-132g


    From a number of angles the result is reminiscent of a bird in flight, very dynamic (and totally by chance).
    Sample p1-132h

    Sample p1-132h


    It is very pleasing that underneath the structure – the dna? – is still evident.

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project: 3D design software
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 1: Surface Distortion
    Project 6: Personal extension: 3D design software

    T1-MMT Polymorph sidetrack

    More sidetracking – Polymorph pellets

    Mat from madmat3dprinting.com.au sent me some polymorph pellets and flexible filament to try. I started with the polymorph pellets. These are thermoplastic that melts at around 60° C and can be moulded by hand.

    Sidetrack sample p1-5 Can I make a multi-coloured plastic lump, roll it out and shape or emboss it?

    Sidetrack p1-5 Materials

    Sidetrack p1-5 Materials


    Polymorph beads and tubs ready to go.
    Sidetrack p1-5 In dyed hot water

    Sidetrack p1-5 In dyed hot water


    Beads in tubs with hot water. Some drops of old silk dyes in a couple.
    Sidetrack p1-5 Result

    Sidetrack p1-5 Result


    Basically the colour was unsuccessful. The colour was squeezed out with the water. There is a slight trace of the pink visible, but I suspect that is more trace “foreign matter” remaining in the plastic (just as there are smears of dirt in the plain sample – the garage is partially open, so always dirty.)

    Sidetrack sample p1-6. Can I remelt and remould plastic no longer in beads?

    Sidetrack p1-6 Remelted in hot water

    Sidetrack p1-6 Remelted in hot water


    One part back in hot water. It went transparent, suggesting it had remelted.
    I quickly kneaded it and rolled it flat with a rolling pin, working quickly as it was already turning white. I pressed in a plastic shape (originally the side of a peg basket, I think)
    Sidetrack p1-6 Embossed

    Sidetrack p1-6 Embossed


    The embossing worked. I think my palm-print is in it – not visible, but the roughness can be felt. The plastic is slightly flexible.
    Sidetrack p1-6 Backlit

    Sidetrack p1-6 Backlit


    Backlit the pattern is very clear.

    Sidetrack sample p1-7.
    Can I print with it?

    Sidetrack p1-7

    Sidetrack p1-7


    I rolled on acrylic paint using a foam roller, and tried to print onto cartridge paper.

    The first two prints (on the left) weren’t successful. The first had too much water in the roller. Both the first two were on a hard surface.
    The third and fourth were printed on a softer surface and are more successful, but I think I can see the influence of my palm print.

    Sidetrack sample p1-8
    Can I clean the paint off and reuse the plastic?

    Sidetrack p1-8 Cleaned and re-embossed

    Sidetrack p1-8 Cleaned


    A toothbrush and cold water got rid of most of the paint. I might have got more with soap and warm (not hot!) water, but I wasn’t too fastidious – I’m curious as to how much colour sticks around after reuse.
    This time I remelted, kneaded and rolled, then back into the water for a soften. Then out, roll and emboss – pressing with the rolling pin rather than my hands.

    The plastic is beginning to look rather grubby and there are some bubbles in it. Air? Water? A reaction to impurities?

    Sidetrack p1-8 Prints

    Sidetrack p1-8 Prints


    On the left I pressed down by hand. On the right I tried to keep the pressure more even, by putting a piece of 3 or 4 mm perspex on top and pressing on that. Although not at all “clean” I rather like the one on the right – it seems to have some character.

    Sidetrack sample p1-9
    Can I use the original object and combine the prints?

    Sidetrack p1-9 Overprinted

    Sidetrack p1-9 Overprinted


    The first attempt, top right, I didn’t think about where I’d put the paint on the stamp. Quite a lively, interesting result. I like the unintended inclusion of the second underprint (the one to the left). It all seems to work together.

    Lower down is the second overprint. I thought much more about placement, and the underprinting was my favourite. I find the result a little dull. Too predictable?

    Sidetrack p1-9 Stocktake

    Sidetrack p1-9 Stocktake


    I now have a rather grubby stamp and two other pieces – one faintly pink, the other faintly yellow.

    Sidetrack sample p1-10 I want to try some inclusions, and make a lacey, fluttery shape.

    Sidetrack p1-10 Inclusions

    Sidetrack p1-10 Inclusions


    A rather amusing interlude later, and I have a flower-like shape firmly attached to some pvc pipe, and little bits of colourful foil all over my work area.
    Sidetrack p1-10 Top view

    Sidetrack p1-10 Top view


    The inclusions work quite nicely (although the leftovers are going into a secure bin as soon as I can track them down).

    I was trying to mould around the pipe and it was a nasty shock when it wouldn’t come loose. Still, this is very useful information. The molten pellets bond very firmly to pvc.

    Sidetrack p1-10 Backlit

    Sidetrack p1-10 Backlit


    Backlit looks good, and there is a clear sense of layers in the inclusions. I think this has a lot of promise – always being careful of the application (no hot water anywhere, and probably not any heat).

    Sidetrack sample p1-11. Can I colour the polymorph plastic using disperse dyes?
    I ironed the back of the relatively flat embossed piece with a paper of disperse dye – between baking paper to protect iron and surface.

    Sidetrack p1-11 Plastic still warm with disperse dye

    Sidetrack p1-11 Plastic still warm with disperse dye


    It looked great when still warm. Above it is still on the paper and the view is actually through the warm plastic to the back.
    Sidetrack p1-11 Dyed plastic

    Sidetrack p1-11 Dyed plastic


    Once cool the paper was removed with just a little patience. The baking paper hadn’t stuck at all when ironing.
    Sidetrack p1-11 Remelting plastic

    Sidetrack p1-11 Remelting plastic


    A little colour floated away in hot water, but most stayed.
    Sidetrack p1-11 Cool remoulded plastic

    Sidetrack p1-11 Cool remoulded plastic


    Strong colour remained in the moulded, cooled plastic!
    Sidetrack p1-11 Backlit - striations visible

    Sidetrack p1-11 Backlit – striations visible


    The backlit view shows striations where the colour isn’t completely mixed through. Rather a nice flower petal effect.

    Sidetrack sample p1-12. Will adding another colour lead to colour mixing?

    Sidetrack p1-12 More colour - still warm

    Sidetrack p1-12 More colour – still warm


    It’s hard to judge what’s happening with colour when the plastic is still warm and transparent.
    Sidetrack p1-12 Stuck paper

    Sidetrack p1-12 Stuck paper


    Patience failed, and some disperse dye paper was left stuck to the plastic.
    Sidetrack p1-12 Cleaned

    Sidetrack p1-12 Cleaned


    It was easy to rub off the paper in cold water.
    I had softened and partly flattened the plastic before ironing with the dye, but the surface was still rough and uptake of colour uneven.
    Sidetrack p1-12 Part mixed

    Sidetrack p1-12 Part mixed


    Part-mixed the plastic shows a lot of colour variation. Of particular interest are some thicker edge parts which remained pink and didn’t soften a lot when remelting. This suggests all sorts of possibilities for colour variation.
    Sidetrack p1-12 Result

    Sidetrack p1-12 Result


    The final, cooled result was a rich purple – the mix of the pink and dark blue dyes added.
    Being able to add strong colour like this really opens the polymorph to all sorts of applications, especially with the ease and flexibility of mixing colours.

    Sidetrack sample p1-13. I decided to return to earlier crumpling experiments with ribs – see for example sample p1-13 (30-March-2015). Very happy with the result.

    Sidetrack p1-13 Ribs

    Sidetrack p1-13 Ribs


    Sidetrack p1-13 Reverse

    Sidetrack p1-13 Reverse


    Sidetrack p1-13 Backlit

    Sidetrack p1-13 Backlit

    Unfortunately this session was cut short. Some ideas to continue with next time :
    * Adding powdered colour. Not my dyes – bad / hazardous to use in powdered form. Other pigments.
    * inclusions – How far can you go? What happens as it loses cohesion or structural integrity?
    * Apply heat in other ways than immersion in hot water? Can one work more precisely?
    * Tendency to catch to itself – avoid by wide / flat container
    * adherence to other plastics -especially ABS filament?
    * Can I write with 3D pen on to /from it?
    * how would it react to scraps of filament included in it?
    * would a stainless steel bar work better than a wooden rolling pin?
    * can one cut/ pierce the hardened plastic – hot needle; awl; various knives?
    * if it adheres to carrier plastic, can I smear it on to use as shaping support?
    * I wanted to get lacey effects, but it pulls more like toffee. Accept this and go for gothic? Fight it -say use tools (awl?) while moulding?

    T1-MMT-P1-p3-e2 Using a heat gun – second session

    I finished the first session using the heat gun on a high (see post 19-April-2015).

    Sample p1-57

    Sample p1-57


    Sample p1-57 seems full of possibilities.
    However…

    Sample p1-58.
    Starting a new day rather annoyed with myself, but determined to see it through. Last night I tried designing and making a 3D plastic support to shrink plastic over. I was tired, clumsy, hurried, lost my way, kept going, and created a montrosity nothing like what was in my head or on the plan.

    Sample p1-58 Plan

    Sample p1-58 Plan


    Sample p1-58 Filament Frame

    Sample p1-58 Filament Frame


    Stubborn set in last night, and continues. Let’s see if I can get plastic on this thing. It occurs to me I don’t need to capture between two layers.
    Sample p1-58a Before

    Sample p1-58a Before


    Not over-covered – maybe I’ll be able to layer. Plus using just a bit of kinetic sand.
    Sample p1-58a

    Sample p1-58a


    Not sure what that is, but it doesn’t look promising.
    Sample p1-58a Detail

    Sample p1-58a Detail


    Although at the detail level there is some piercing, and mysterious lumpy distortions. The opaque wrapping disguises and makes dull – although it makes me think of Christo’s work, particularly some packages I saw at AGNSW (http://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/collection/works/249.2011/). Apparently no-one knows what’s inside them. Masterpieces? Junk? Better than the wrapped trees, which just accentuated that they were long dead (http://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/collection/works/250.2011.a-b/).

    Back on topic, what would cellophane do?

    Sample p1-58b before

    Sample p1-58b before


    Sample p1-58b During

    Sample p1-58b During


    The cellophane was doing nothing, so I turned up the heat a bit – and my plastic filament armature softened and collapsed.
    Sample p1-58b After - collapsed

    Sample p1-58b After – collapsed


    Poor little thing. The cellophane wasn’t attached at all, and I have a slumped mess.
    If the cellophane wasn’t attached, is the carrier bag?
    Sample p1-58b Bag detached

    Sample p1-58b Bag detached


    No! Just a little fiddling where things were curled around, and it separated. (I also stopped to shade the direct light from the window, so hopefully photos will improve).

    Sample p1-59. Recycling the previous sample!
    First, a new mould in kinetic sand.

    Sample p1-59 Mould

    Sample p1-59 Mould


    The old form cut open and spread on.
    Sample p1-59 Before

    Sample p1-59 Before


    Sample p1-59a. Initial result:
    Sample p1-59a

    Sample p1-59a


    It softened and wriggled around and suddenly what was an awkward mistake has me intrigued. The outside is very textured, the inside less so, but not smooth.
    Sample p1-59b.
    Sample p1-59b Before

    Sample p1-59b Before


    I put on and scattered around some more bits.
    Sample p1-59b After - on mould

    Sample p1-59b After – on mould


    Extra bits went on, I learnt to work on one area at a time, to be conscious of the force of the blowing, to press with tongs after a blast for shaping and to encourage connections.
    I toòk it off the mould, realised there were some weak points and bad connections, and was able to improve them.
    Sample p1-59b - Bowl turned down

    Sample p1-59b – Bowl turned down


    It’s a bit more crazy and fun on the outside than the side facing the mould. You could break it without any trouble if you wanted to – and probably when you didn’t want to too. But if I wanted to I could keep going, add more layers and more strength.
    I can see lots of places to go with this – additional layers and strength; using an impression mould so the crazier bits are on the inside and more visible; preparing a loose mass of squiggles and placing on form to trace it (the thicker pieces of filament which either had not gone through the pen or went through quickly at similar diameter were the least successful in shaping and melding); preparing a relatively flat piece, then warming and shaping it freestyle…
    It means any little piece of scrap filament can find a use.
    However at this point I’ll move on.

    Sample p1-60.

    Sample p1-60 Before

    Sample p1-60 Before


    Some clear polythene folded over. It may look boring, but if it distorts interestingly there could be possibilities.
    Sample p1-60 After

    Sample p1-60 After


    Definitely distortion, although not as much bonding of the layers as I was hoping for. Still, enough to continue.

    Sample p1-61.

    Sample p1-61 Before

    Sample p1-61 Before


    Feathers and rubber bands inside polythene.
    Sample p1-61 After

    Sample p1-61 After


    Sample p1-61 Shadows

    Sample p1-61 Shadows


    Perhaps I tried to do too much with one little sample. Are there possibilities to exploit here? There are some coloured shadows, which could be interesting. It’s not speaking to me.

    Sample p1-62. Would that light pink plastic that shrivelled under the iron do anything interesting (sample p1-52)?

    Sample p1-62 Before

    Sample p1-62 Before


    Before – bit of a blurry action shot, as the afternoon breeze picks up.
    Sample p1-62 After

    Sample p1-62 After


    Wow! Look at that cell structure!
    Sample p1-62 Backlit

    Sample p1-62 Backlit


    Backlit. How nice is that???

    Sample p1-63. I have some light white plastic, sold at a cheapy shop as “heavy duty table cover”. It’s a little heavier than the pink and has a slight texture. Will that act in a similar way?

    Sample p1-63 Before

    Sample p1-63 Before


    Sample p1-63a After

    Sample p1-63a After


    Quite similar. This is exciting because the table covers come in a range of colours. They are also large and cheap.
    It’s certainly soft enough to stitch into, although it might tear.
    Sample p1-63b. On an impulse I cut it into a length.
    Sample p1-63b Cut

    Sample p1-63b Cut


    And made a little chain of finger crochet.
    Sample p1-63b Chained

    Sample p1-63b Chained


    Sample p1-63b Backlit

    Sample p1-63b Backlit


    More interesting in the photos than in life. It’s just so limp and drab.
    I could heat it and see what happened next.
    Sample p1-63c. Instead I decided to twist it
    Sample p1-63c Twisted

    Sample p1-63c Twisted


    Sample p1-63d. And ply it back on itself.
    Sample p1-63d

    Sample p1-63d


    The twist was a bit too soft perhaps, but it might make an interesting texture in a weaving, especially as one can play with colours.
    Sample p1-63e. I took out the twist and did a new crochet chain.
    Sample p1-63e

    Sample p1-63e


    Sample p1-63f. Then used the heatgun
    Sample p1-63f

    Sample p1-63f


    Sample p1-63f Backlit

    Sample p1-63f Backlit


    Good shape. I like the irregularity that is also linear. It’s moderately flexible, a little crackly. You could probably stitch through it, or bits of it, but I think it wouldn’t be pleasant. For some reason I think of it in a coiled basket, but you wouldn’t want to compress the life out of it. I should use it as a printing tool the next time I have the paints or inks out.

    Sample p1-64. I have no idea what kitchen wipes are made of, but wanted to try one.

    Sample p1-64 Before

    Sample p1-64 Before


    Sample p1-64 During

    Sample p1-64 During


    During. Lots of movement, which you can control to an extent by where you direct the air.
    Still pliable. Some holes forming, so I want to push further.
    Sample p1-64 After

    Sample p1-64 After


    Sample p1-64 Detail

    Sample p1-64 Detail


    More shrinking and some holes forming. Still strong – didn’t tear with a sharp tug. Still pliable. It just doesn’t excite me. I think the pattern is too strong.

    T1-MMT-P1-p3-e2 Using a heat gun – second session
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 1: Surface Distortion
    Project 3: Heating and fusing
    Exercise 2: Using a heat gun


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