Archive Page 2

Exhibitions: Steel for now; Recalibrate; Arcadia

Caroline Duffy and Ellenore Griffith Steel for now
This exhibition by sculptors Caroline Duffy and Ellenore Griffith is in its final week at Gallery Lane Cove. I’ve been fortunate to spend some quiet time with the exhibition, plus hear the artists speak about their work and their creative paths. The works felt familiar and exciting, inspirational… aspirational.

The two artists met at a National Art School class in welded sculpture around 11 years ago – basically the same class I took last year (22-Jan-2017). They have since worked independently and collaboratively. In the talks they went into quite a bit of detail about the methods and challenges of welding, with some really helpful discussion and generous tips about managing safety concerns. Their assessment was the same as mine – welding, grinding etc are serious things with clear dangers, not something you can do casually in a domestic environment. However they had a few suggestions about how to create other possibilities, find other environments, which gives me a bit more optimism for the future.

Steel for now installation view
Caroline Duffy


As well as her work in steel Caroline Duffy showed a number of collage works. I had an immediate and very strong positive response. At a deep level these works resonated with me. It’s a response to material and form, which seems to be the way in which Duffy herself views her work. In her talk she explained that the material leads. She adds material – “stuff” – then takes away stuff. Process, the sheer fun of the work, is the thing and it’s never outsourced.

Caroline Duffy
KYLIX

Duffy’s work is named with meaningless groupings of letters. There is no narrative in her work. In fact if by chance something literal is suggested, say a bird, then she will remove or change that area.

Germination II


I felt like a fellow traveler, maybe a younger sibling. More resonance or suggestion than specific. For example the general form, the repeated elements, the material of KYLIX had me thinking of Germination II (30-Jun-2017). Mine looks fussy by comparison, but that textile sensibility, the threadlike basketry elements, is important to me and something I feel I should focus on.

Ellenore Griffith
Paper Plane

Ellenore Griffith discussed the experimental approach she takes with her work, putting elements together then taking days or weeks looking at them, adjusting in minor or major ways, until she is satisfied and proceeds to welding.

Like Duffy, Griffith is not narrative in her work. She states “My hope is that these sculptures can be appreciated on an aesthetic and imaginative level rather than allowing environmental or social issues to take over the narrative.” However she is happy to accept titles suggested by others, accepting to some level the seeking for meaning or known points of reference that we often bring when looking at an artwork.

Ellenore Griffith
Sheer Red

I find it refreshing, perhaps liberating, to hear such strong statements treating material, form, aesthetic response as the purpose and reason for art. So many people choose to use their art as a means of bringing attention to social, environmental or other issues that concern them. I don’t in any way reject or question that meaning and purpose. If an artist has strongly held beliefs or wants to bring attention to a cause then using their art to publicise and express that can be an important contribution to social discourse. It’s more that I personally don’t have such drivers, and it feels good, validating, to be reminded that that is one option among many, none more nor less legitimate than others.

Tracy Stirzaker Recalibrate
Tracy Stirzaker’s exhibition Recalibrate is also in its last week at Gallery Lane Cove.

Stirzaker uses textile collage, embroidery, installation and soft sculpture in this exhibition, which stems from a recent 3-month artist residency.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The themes of the work revolve around mental health, the emotional body, and the concept of being overwhelmed in the everyday. I thought the works were very effective in expressing these ideas.

One more technical aspect I particularly appreciated was the coherence of the works. A limited palette of fabrics was used, basically a blue and white kitchen towel material and a number of black and white fabrics. Forms and images were repeated – the straight jacket in different materials; a series of silhouettes in collage and stitch; the straight jacket presented as an installation, in a series of photographs taken in the streets nearby, in a video of a silhouetted, straight-jacketed body struggling for freedom. The repetition made for a more compelling exhibition, but also was expressive of the themes being explored.

Ewa Pachucka Arcadia: landscape and bodies
This installation can currently be seen at the Art Gallery of NSW.

Ewa Pachucka

Ewa Pachucka

It is fascinating on a number of levels to see this multi-part installation Arcadia: landscape and bodies (1972-77). It was created within the context of 1970s fibre art, and first exhibited at the Gallery in 1978.

There are references to classical art (and world) history, notions of collectivism, feminism and environmentalism. Most importantly there is the elevation of textile traditions and craft into the privileged realm of fine art.

What’s had me thinking is a recent incident in a group installation, part of a larger exhibition. It’s not one I’ve written about, and I won’t go into detail because quite possibly the story has been distorted in the telling (something that could be interesting in its own right). In any case, the story I’ve heard is that the group, all women, prepared a number of elements as part of the installation. Included was a large piece that deliberately evoked the look of a patchwork quilt. That element was rejected by the curator of the exhibition as “too crafty”. It was displayed, folded up, partially covered by other material, in a way to minimize its presence.

Was the curator simply exercising her (note gender) role, effectively excluding work she didn’t see as appropriate in some quality? Given it was a very conscious, deliberate evocation of the domestic by the artists, does it show a lack of understanding by the curator? Do we need to fight yet again for the place of the domestic, the place of textile traditions and craft, in the realm of art? Does it make a difference that it wasn’t actually a textile in traditional terms?

Diversion – coming soon


This exhibition was previously code-named “other potential project” (14-Jan-2018, 21-Jan-2018, 4-Feb-2018) and “confluence” (18-Feb-2018, 25-Feb-2018).

Confluence

The second code-name was actually the name for the new work I’ve made for the theme. In brief, the question I asked myself was – could I bring together all the different materials and techniques I’ve been experimenting with over the last year or two and bring them together coherently – in balance and harmony? Were they just so many diversions, or were they currents and channels in a greater stream? Secondary question – could I remain provisional, keep experimenting and exploring, right to the last moments available?

The answer to both turned out to be a slightly vague “well, kinda, pretty much…”. The time I used to the last drop, assisted by misreading the due date and discovering I had a week less than I thought. Some materials and techniques weren’t used, and more components didn’t survive a pretty fierce editing. It’s enough for me to feel that it fits the confluence idea, the streams of inquiry and exploration coming together, at least momentarily.

For any readers who will be in Sydney over the exhibition period, it would be great to see/meet you – particularly on the opening night or for the artist talks.

The photo above is flat and static, not at all what a mobile is about. I’ll try to take some video when it’s up in the gallery. In the meantime, something that gives at least an idea of movement, light and shadow…

The Red Project – installed

The Red Project is currently on at a number of venues around North Sydney. See the North Sydney Council website for more details – https://www.northsydney.nsw.gov.au/Community_Services/Arts_Culture/Arts_Culture_Events/The_Red_Project and my previous post 15-Feb-2018 for some background.

Basketry NSW’s Shades of Red pops against the rich green of new turf – helped by all the rain on installation day!

The Coal Loader venue is a great re-use of some industrial heritage.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

As well as Shades of Red there is an installation by the Primrose Park Paper Arts group, plus in a series of chambers off one of the tunnels there are installations by individual artists.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

There’s lots of activity scheduled over the coming weekend, including on Saturday demos and mini-workshops by members of Basketry NSW.

Variations on a theme

That heading isn’t quite it. A sense of recognition or familiarity, but in a new context or with a different emphasis, going deeper or at a tangent. Of richness, complexity. Resonance.

A small example: This week’s lecture at AGNSW, Peter Kohane speaking on “Ancient Greece: the invention of the classical orders”. Back to The Canon, which so puzzled me when studying art history (13-Apr-2013) – but totally different. This time round the focus was on the analogy between a human being and the columnar orders, underpinned by the concept of the human body as a type of perfection. The idea of timber temple elements imitated in stone was familiar, then enriched with more detail, with the idea that the monument has within it a sense of time and a memory of earlier ceremonies. The formal nature of a Greek temple – no straight lines, but curves which compensate for angle of view and fall of light. And suddenly it’s a philosophical question: where does truth lie – “objective”, or in relation to the beholder who perceives an ideal beauty?

Another from this week, and also relating to the art history course: a visit to The Barracks museum in Sydney. Previously seen 11-May-2013 when it was all about the architecture. Visited this week, I appreciated the history it presented – particularly related to convicts and 19th century immigration; plus the reflection on the nature of the museum itself – the archaeological dig, the choices made in displaying aspects of the building and its history.

Lots more musing going on, but let’s up the tempo and look at something solid.

A variant of setup for resin had a range of heat-distressed fabrics (4-Feb-2018) suspended over drip trays lined with plastic and filled with oddments and experiments.

Raffia in resin

Threads in resin

More threads in resin

Rubber bands in resin

The drip tray contents were selected with an eye to the moving water theme.

On initial review none really excite, but they’ll all go in the stash as holders of possibilities and potential.

Possibly it was false economy. The fabrics don’t have as thick a coating of resin as would have been possible if I’d kept scooping up and re-applying the drips until the resin exothermic reaction kicked in. Lots to play with here, especially manipulating the fabric as the resin hardens.

Although not quite as robust as envisaged, some of the fabric has been cut and looping in wire added.

Heat distressed fabric in resin, looping in galvanised steel

A very pleasing result. Light, texture, shine, transparency, an ocean swell.

A very different variation on the watery theme started with some steel offcuts from welding what is now known as Waymarker (22-Jan-2017 and 4-Feb-2018).

Metal cut and transformed

Cut out with a jeweller’s piercing saw, drilled to create a classic moving water symbol. Smoothed and polished.

After a few classes which included using the saw the process felt good.

The next step of incorporating some basketry techniques and materials already using in codename confluence was a little tricker, but overall I think the result works with other elements.

Steel, threads. Random weave.

The hope remains that the different pieces will come together and transform under gallery lights and the movement of the mobile.

Metal and more

Codename Confluence
Previously this was known as “other potential project” (4-Feb-2018). Thinking and work is progressing on the new piece, still based on moving water, particularly river currents, eddies, backwaters, billabongs… I’m expecting it to take the form of a mobile (not locked in yet) – balance is another part of the story. So far focus has been on developing some individual elements, looking for some level of transparency so they interact with the light and gallery environment.

Silver fabric in resin, coiling

Photographed propped against a waterglass to give an idea of how it could look in open space, this is about 11.5 cm diameter. Not convinced I like the soft texture of the threads against the hard surfaces of resin and galvanised steel wire I’m using elsewhere. The v-stitch of the coiling reminds me of zigzag graphic designs for water.

Thread in resin, neolithic twining in wire

Really like this combination of threads in resin and neolithic twining in steel wire. It’s 12.5 cm wide. If I have time I want to make a companion piece exploring this combination further.

Metal smithing class with Jane Tadrist
Nine hours over three weeks at Sydney Community College, this was a great chance to consolidate and extend my metal working skills.

Copper tealight in progress

We could choose to make a cuff or a tealight. I really wanted to get a handle on soldering, so went for the tealight. The design reflects my “moving water” theme, and was deliberately kept simple so I could finish in good time.

Soldering was completed in the final minutes of the class (yay!). I should be able to do the finishing here at home.

vessel wip from Christian Hall class

Sadly that meant I didn’t have time to complete the soldering still required on my little vessel begun in the Christian Hall workshop (7-Jan-2018). In theory Jane was happy for me to work on it – but dratted time got me again.

Hope is not lost. I’ve booked on another class with Jane later this year. Maybe third time lucky for this little brass object. Another possibility is setting up a soldering area in my workroom at home – hoping that will happen before the end of the year.

Lady and the Unicorn exhibition
Six stunning tapestries made circa 1500 are now on exhibit at the Art Gallery of NSW, on loan from France.

Detail of The sixth sense – heart, desire or will

While there are side galleries of interpretive detail, the actual tapestries are in a single dimly lit room, surrounding the viwer. The impact is amazing. I’m not sure how big they are. The Lady could be near life size.

Still a detail

The photo above shows one small detail in the largest tapestry. To the right is another view of the same piece – still just a detail.

There’s lots of information and many much better photos on the gallery website linked above. All very accurate and objective and academic. The works themselves, the whole experience of standing there drinking them in, is an emotional and physical thing.

ARTEXPRESS 2018 exhibition
Also at AGNSW is this year’s selection of student artworks developed for the artmaking component of the HSC examination in Visual Arts 2017.

How Irrigating
Hannah Raeside

A wonderful mix of media and intent. I particularly enjoyed Hannah Raeside’s work playing with garden hose and fittings. It’s an exploration of shape and form, taking something very prosaic and creating abstract beauty.

Shades of Red

A previously embargoed project can now be revealed: Shades of Red, one of a series of exhibitions and events making up The Red Project: Celebrating Creative Women in North Sydney.

Shades of Red will be a collaborative, site specific installation of 32 umbrellas by 22 artists from Basketry NSW. The process was collaborative from the start, with selection of a theme and development of criteria. Each individual piece started with an actual umbrella or parasol frame. We used shades of red, with limited use of black, white and natural. Naturally basketry techniques play a major part of construction. Ideas of sustainability/recycling and International Women’s Day were also considered, as was durability and safety in an outdoor installation.

I’ve seen quite a few of the individual works, and there is an amazing array. Most retain a basic umbrella shape, but there are a few very inventive exceptions. It will be exciting to see them all come together at the venue – installation begins in around 10 days, and the actual exhibition is 3 – 18 March.

I have made two umbrellas.
The first was based on an umbrella I bought while living in the UK in the early 1980s. It has been dubbed an “un-brella”. Yarn and heat-distressed organza, random weave, coated in resin. I wanted to play up how useless it now is, so there are tatters and permanent resin “raindrops” dripping.

Given the outdoor setting of the installation I really wanted some interesting shadows, and it’s great to see them plus the sparkle of resin in the sunshine.

An umbrella used by my children was my second starting point, happily already red in handle and other fittings. Steel wire, random weave, cold forged and painted. The weave is spaced to create an effect of stripes – tricky to capture in the photo, especially with the satisfying shadows.

Shades of Red will be open 3 – 18 March at the Coal Loader Centre for Sustainability, 2 Balls Head Drive, Waverton. Note that the specific area of the installation will be ‘The Terrace’ (stairs behind the café), a late change not reflected in printed versions of the Council material. There will be basketry demonstrations and mini-workshops 11 – 2 Saturday 10 March.

For more information see www.northsydney.nsw.gov.au/redproject

‘Shades of Red’ is part of THE RED PROJECT, a North Sydney Council Arts & Cultural event exhibiting artworks by 74 artists at 6 venues throughout the month of March, in celebration of creative women in North Sydney and International Women’s Day.

Some momentum

Pace and energy are beginning to build. It’s a good feeling.

Object 2 of embargoed project 1 has been painted and just needs a check, touch up and tidy up to be done. It’s due for installation with its peers later this month. A teaser photo when it’s entirely done, and hopefully full details of the project can be shared soon.

The other potential project is looking more and more certain. I’m contributing two pieces.

Waymarker

The first has been seen before – an output from the welding sculptures workshop with Paul Hopmeier last year (22-Jan-2017). Given this new (still potential) exhibition is being developed in a very short time, recent and relevant work is being accepted as well as new work.

The work was never entirely finished, so the rust has been largely cleared off (not entirely – I think some is appropriate to my ideas about it) and some wax has been applied for a glow and to protect against ongoing rusting. I’m really happy that it’s going to have a chance to been shown.

Play continues on a new piece for this exhibition. The thinking behind includes currents and eddies and flashes of sunlight in a river.

Some looping techniques in different weights of wire might just possibly suggest droplets of water in the sun. A range of synthetic fabrics in watery colours have been heat treated and I’m planning resin. On the right is a scrap piece of resin with threads embedded, cut out and used as a centre for neolithic twining (? never sure of this – need to check with the basketry people) in wire. Not the colours I want, but some very exciting possibilities being generated.

Also this week I started a beginners class in silversmithing. Too soon to have anything to show, but it seems exactly what I need to address the problems experienced in the Sturt summer school class (7-Jan-2018).

There’s even been reading! Plus the first of this year’s lecture series at the Art Gallery.


Calendar of Posts

May 2018
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Archives

Categories