Archive for the 'Weaving' Category



Project 9 Stage 4 – part 2

See my post of 6-Nov-2012 for the initial work on this stage. It was fairly well progressed, but with a major question mark about how well I could create shapes in the planned scale of the weaving plus a big gap in process with no yarn wrapping done.
The first question was resolved pretty easily. I put on my cotton warp and did a quick, temporary sample with the yarn bundles already developed. The angular shaping I wanted worked quite well and with a fairly wide sett I was able to get good coverage of the warp with my yarn bundles. (I just left the un-needed warp ends pushed to the side).
Encouraged by this I went on to do a full yarn wrapping. This photo shows the original photo combination, the wrapping, plus a separate card to help me reproduce the yarn bundles. Clearly some of my colour mixes are quite different to the photo.
Maybe they didn’t match the printed photo, but what about the photo on my computer screen, other photos from the island, and most importantly colours in my head from having been there just a few weeks ago? There are different colours in a couple of the build-up sketches I did where I had stepped away from the original images into a more geometric arrangement. Add into all of that the colours that I think will look good together in a woven piece. My choice was to regard the photos as part of the inspiration and a guide, but not a “source of truth”. This turned out to be an ongoing battle during the weaving – holding on to my rather abstracted design and not reverting to a more literal approach.
The finished work is about 41cm by 12 cm. It’s irregular in shape, but that’s less apparent in real life. Also the orange areas at the bottom are strong but don’t shout as they do in the photo.
Generally I’ve been able to get the diagonal lines that I wanted. The image is more recognisable than I intended. I think the mixing of the yarns bundles worked well. At a distance there are clear blocks of colour (except for a mid-blue group in the middle below the point which is indistinguishable from the slightly darker blue to its left). Close up there is lots of interest when you can see the individual colours. Close or distant, the mixing provides good texture that works for both the granite and the water. I chose not to add any extra textural elements with soumak – it would have been out of scale and I think an awkward interruption to the main image. Plus it would be technically difficult – at times I had four weft bundles working at once, all creating different diagonals, and that was quite enough to think about.
It was interesting to experience the impact of the preparation process. The early part of the weaving went fairly easily, even though I was still learning technique. However I hadn’t fully resolved the shapes around the rockpool in any of my sketches, largely because I didn’t have the experience to know what I would find possible in practice. In the event I was able to get some nice shapes – in particular that triangle of blacks and greys coming in from the left.
The area near the top has a couple of horizontals, particularly the shore line of the distant island. This makes the work much more readable as an image and horizontals in the water were part of my original plan. On balance I like the variety it gives – but it would be interesting to see a version that continued diagonals throughout.
This photo shows the inspiration photo, the final work and the sketch which first showed me how I could use the inspiration in a piece of weaving. To me it illustrates a bit more clearly my reasons or process in moving quite far from the photo colours, particularly in the foreground granite and lichen.
The course notes have questions on specific areas of the project at this point.
* Variety of yarns and other materials, and impact on look and feel of samples.
In the early stages (posted 14-Oct-2012) I used a variety of “standard” yarns – wools, bundled yarns, fancy knitting yarns and torn strips of cloth. In my larger sample in stage 3 (posted 21-Oct-2012) I re-purposed materials from hardware and jewllery-findings stores, plus spun various papers and kitchen goods. My final sample from that stage (posted 26-Oct-2012) was largely newspaper, neoprene and insect screen. The sample from stage 4, shown in this post, returned to more traditional yarns – a wide variety of natural and man-made yarns bundled together. To my surprise weaving accepts, accommodates, tames and unifies them all. There is beautiful visual texture from the newspaper, forming my pebbly beach. Creating the yarn bundles above posed different challenges to spinning newspaper, but the results were just as effective in their own way in suggesting a rugged shoreline. In my weaving in the past the specific materials were critical – for example the combination of 20/2 silk and a laceweight Cashmerino (70% merino, 30% cashmere) in a deflected doubleweave scarf (posted 25-Oct-2009) to create a beautiful texture by taking advantage of their different properties in washing. I wouldn’t want to wash any of these new weavings!
* Weaving compared to other techniques.
This was not weaving-as-I-knew-it, but I still found it very enjoyable and absorbing. I love the whole idea of creating cloth; that the image or pattern is integral to the very substance of the result, not just added in or painted on. It seems more personal, more thoroughly an expression of my self. It could be seen as slow, but french knots are slower. It could be seen as repetitive, but especially with this style of weaving I was making decisions and watching for possibilities all the time – although in honesty I enjoy the repetitive, alert meditation of “standard” weaving. It has its limits, as does everything – for example I abandoned my ideas about grasses on a beach. I’m really looking forward to combining weaving with other techniques more.
* Aspects of the final sample.
The quick answer is that I like it very much. The proportions work well with the diagonal design and the depth of image that I wanted. I think the textures work well, and there is a variation that supports and enhances the design. The lumpy, uneven shape is distracting – a combination of poor technique and differences in thickness of the yarn bundles, plus my choice of equipment could be a factor. I wouldn’t want to change the yarn bundles, but better technique, experience and slowing down a bit could help. There’s an area just below the outcrop of rock where I intended different shapes, but my yarn choice was poor and two of the shapes merge. The fix there is clear! Also as mentioned above it would be interesting to try a version that stepped further from the original image into a more pure play of colour and angles.
* Design process.
It’s quite clear to me that I got a better result by attending to the design process. I did _not_ want to do the yarn wrapping. I felt I had done a few trials and that going further would be just a formality with no particular benefit. Instead I found it helped me to focus and identify problems in my initial yarn bundles. Based on the wrapping I made a number of improvements as I went. One that didn’t work was in the blue area already mentioned. With hindsight I should have done a second wrapping or adjusted the first until I was completely happy. At the time I felt I was getting stale and would loose enthusiasm for and interest in the actual weaving.
* Working from source material versus putting colours together intuitively.
In the past I have thought of a theme (say “hydrangeas”), looked through some photos, but made the actual yarn choices from memory and emotion rather than carefully analysing source material. In the final sample I enjoyed the hybrid approach (apart from concerns about not meeting the assignment brief). Careful experimentation and planning allowed me to refine choices and correct mistakes. That didn’t work entirely, but I think I prefer to risk a few mistakes (aka learning opportunities) rather than rigidly locking in choices and not having the flexibility to respond to the work in front of me. There were some colour problems in both my final sample and the seaweed/stoney beach sample – but I think experience will help me avoid similar problems in the future.
Re-reading the above, I see quite a bit of conflict in my responses. Do a second wrapping to refine colour choices, but risk errors to allow flexibility. Well, I’ve long thought that consistency is over-rated. More seriously, I feel there is enjoyment and risk in both approaches. I wouldn’t want to rule out either.

Project 9 Woven Structures Stages 1 & 2

Stage 1 of this project is to set up a tapestry frame, with suggestions for using a picture frame or art shop stretcher frame. I decided to improvise using my four shaft table loom.
In standard use it would look like this – a frame with a roller at the back to hold the warp, a roller at the front to hold the new cloth, a castle protruding up which has levers to select which shaft/s (and therefore warp ends) to lift, and a beater/reed assembly that spaces the warp ends and is used to push each new pick of weft into place (hard to see in this photo). The photo is from a 5-feb-2010 post.

The loom was in a bit of a mess. The warp left over from a class last year with Jason Collingwood (post 23-Apr-2011) was still threaded and wrapped around the castle. The castle/shaft assembly simply lifts out of the frame, so that wasn’t a problem – but I couldn’t bear to waste that beautiful linen warp. It’s not the cotton suggested in the course notes, but it seemed a reasonable substitute.

This is the end arrangement. The linen warp I was “saving” wasn’t a continuous length. Instead of wrapping the frame as suggested in the course notes, I wound onto the warp beam and lashed onto the cloth beam as I would normally, but with castle and beater taken out of the frame. I used a shed stick and heading cord as in the notes, plus a heddle rod and continuous string heddles. That last part stung me – I didn’t cross-check on my memory, and didn’t set it up properly – there’s a really nice tutorial with photos and video on this link, from Laverne Waddington’s incredibly informative blog backstrapweaving.wordpress.com.

Stage 2 involved experimentation with basic tapestry weaving techniques. It’s 23 – 25 cm wide (yes, I had some draw-in ūüôā ) and 27 cm long. Things are rather crammed in and hard to see, especially in photos. Not optimal – I was very conscious of postal weight and costs, combined with the fact that the sample is all or nothing, I can’t select which parts to include in the package for my tutor. I also had trouble with colour in the photographs. All the full shots were particularly bad, and I ended up fiddling with the colour on the best. Most of the photos below are straight from the camera (apart from scaling), with some odd inconsistencies in colour. (I’m not counting the huge variations in the three photos above of the same loom sitting on the same bench. They were taken at different times in different lights using different cameras.)

I started with some lovely Hy-craft rug wool from Glenora Weaving (the red and orange) and a slightly thinner green wool. From bottom to top:

* base of all red;

* stripes of two picks green, two picks red, repeated;

* columns of one pick green, one pick red. An extra pick of red then back to one and one meant that the column colours changed;

* 3 picks green, one pick red gave a dotted effect, with the dots staggered rather than in columns;

* an area of curved wefts in green, orange and a little red. This involved weaving back and forward in small sections, creating shapes.

The next section got hidden in the overall photo. The weft is torn strips of cotton fabric, first in a couple of curved areas to get back to a straight fell line, then some plain weave. I love the way the pattern crushes up.

Next two picks of rug wool to firm things up, a row of soumak in the fabric, two more picks of rug wool and a row of soumak back in the other direction. It looks a bit like a plait laid on top of the tapestry. I like it very much. There’s pattern and texture and it looks somehow sturdy and self-contained, while also decorative and fun.

This wall of ghiordes knots is what hides the cotton fabric. Each knot is four lengths of rug wool, so eight cut ends or tufts, which is pretty bulky and assertive. I tried to get a graduation from orange to green across the width. I haven’t trimmed the ends so they are rather wild and uneven. That’s my default preference, unless there is a specific purpose or requirement that a more structured, formal line of knots would suit.

After a couple of stabilising picks of plain weave I tried a row of continuous ghiordes knots, this time four strands of the red rug wool.

It’s interesting that some of the loops sit a bit differently. I think I may have twisted the strands together a bit at some points, while at others they were sitting side by side in the knot. That could be a real trap in a larger piece, depending on the effect you want.

In this photo across the weaving you can see the actual green/orange knots at the base. It could be interesting to play with this, changing the side where the knot sits – either in single row of knots or in repeated rows.

This section is so much nicer in person. I bundled together 10 or 12 fine threads, all different reds. There’s some wool, 2 ply and singles, cottons and lots of anonymous bits. I tried soumak over four threads, at first over the full width of the weaving then in discontinuous areas.
I introduced a green bundle of threads, mixed in amongst the red. For some additional variety I used a mixture of soumak over two threads and over four threads. The mix of different colours in each bundle, some matt wool, some shiny mercerised cotton, gives a really lively, glowing effect. The relief texture produced by the soumak also adds interest and variety. I can see this being used in ocean colours to suggest ruffled water. Depending on proportions and colour choice it could be a background foil providing quiet interest, or an intense focal point.
Here I went away from the course requirements, on my own little adventure. On the right in the green is a slit in the plain weave where I wove in sections rather than back and forward over the entire width. Instead of neatly starting fresh at the bottom of each section I just carried the weft yarn down from the top of the previous section. Possibly a useful effect – some deeper shadow or even a gap from the slit, and the vertical instead of horizontal line of the yarn (good to have the variation in colour to enhance that). One could also use the loop of yarn to attach… something. On the left is a more extreme experiment. I’ve been fascinated by the yarn wrapping in Sheila Hicks’ work. Follow this link and scroll down to Zapallar to see what I mean (an aside – I just found that link, from the Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC, and I so, so, so much wish I could visit there).

Assuming most people don’t click through, as a poor substitute I’ve included a shot from my sketchbook, based on Hicks’ work. On this first attempt at wrapping I continued with carrying down thread from the previous column. It gives a variation in texture, but is a bit distracting and confusing visually. Some latter attempts in the sampler work better.

lace & finger manipulated sampler

While I’m off-track, I’ll add that this carry-down idea was based on spanish lace. The red/grey example is from August-2008. I’m pretty sure there is some of this in Anni Albers piece that I looked at yesterday. All to me very interesting, and another great way to add movement and space and variety to what is basically plain weave, but definitely out of scope for this project.

This next section is mostly variations of previous techniques. There are curved or eccentric wefts, this time in a variety of fabrics. I outlined each area with a row of soumak in rug wool. I really like weaving with fabric strips, but in this weft-faced tapestry I found it difficult to beat it down enough to cover the warp. The rug wool knots are nice and firm and keep things packed down. It also gives some nice definition to the shapes I was forming. While working I was thinking of rock strata – with the right fabric choice this could work really well.

On the right of the photo you can see another version of the wrapped warps. I love the possibilities for playing with horizontal and vertical, and dense areas with space. The row of orange soumak towards the top gives some lovely shadow and a little height. This was done over four warp threads, perhaps with a slightly looser tension, and give quite a different effect to the over-two-threads red below. The relatively smooth weaving in wool around it, rather than the textured fabric, also adds to the effect.

The sharp angle of green meeting orange is another off-project technique. It’s clasped or interlocking wefts. Kaz Madigan (curiousweaver.id.au) has some nice photos on how to do it here and a video tutorial here. There are also diagrams of some alternative versions in Albers’ book.

These three thumbnails show my attempt to experiment with fancy yarns. They are side by side near the top of the weaving. I’ve heard/read somewhere that fancy yarns are more effective if given some space – you see move of the texture if it’s contrasted to areas of non-texture. So with each yarn I first did single picks to get dots of colour and texture surrounded by green, then two picks in a row to get a line, then a row of soumak to get a heavy, raised line, then a row of continuous (uncut) ghiordes knots to get still more height and yarn showing. Clearly I didn’t leave enough open space around each section. In the photos it’s just a muddled mass/mess. Fortunately it’s possible when holding the sampler in your hands to cover up the surrounding bits and concentrate on a particular section, so it is still usable. The effects achieved are definitely different, and as always which you would choose to use depends of what you’re trying to do.

My final experiment used a more complex fabric and thread combination. I’ve enjoyed the height and springy-ness of organza in previous work in the course. This variation has two colours of synthetic organza. It looked a little dull and I was concerned that the colours might blend into blah while weaving, so I added some sparkle with four different metallic threads, everything wound together on a small stick shuttle. The first section is continuous, uncut ghiordes knots, since I thought that would give the space and height to really show off the organza’s oomph. In my eyes it worked well in a rather cheap-and-cheerful way. I’m thinking sunshine and sea-side rock (the boiled sugar confectionery).

Partway through I realised I hadn’t created enough “yarn” for a full row of ghiordes knots, so I finished with some simple loops. To do this you weave a pick, then with the shed still open use a knitting needle to pick up a loop of yarn each place the weft sits over the warp, then close the shed and beat gently with the knitting needle still in place supporting the loops. Obviously it’s all pretty unstable – there are no knots to keep the loops in place – so keep the knitting needle there for the next few picks and beat them down firmly. Different size needles will give different size loops, and of course you don’t have to pick up at every point – you could have a line that stops and starts or trails off…… ….. .. . . .¬†¬†¬†¬† .
After all the above I’m reasonably happy with this sampler. I didn’t use a huge variety of wefts – that’s in the next stage. I think I stayed true to the general thrust of the project requirements, with just a few variations and additions that I learnt in “normal” (to me) weaving but that make sense in tapestry. Some of them worked (the final wrapped columns), others not so much (the spanish lace variants). I just need to keep pushing.

Resources:
Albers, A., (1965) On Weaving. Dover edition published 2003, an unabridged reproduction ed. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press.
Simon, J and Faxon, S (2010) Sheila Hicks: 50 years, Andover, Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy in association with Yale University Press

Reading about Weaving

Throughout this OCA course I’ve been looking forward to Project 9 with a mixture of excitement and trepidation. For the past several years weaving has been my textile focus/obsession – but this isn’t weaving as I know it. I’ve been warming up by re-reading a couple of classic weaving texts.

Weaving as an art form: A personal statement by Theo Moorman includes a lot of information about the weaving technique she developed and which is named after her. The Moorman Technique combines a ground weave with inlaid colour that is bound or tied to the ground using a separate fine warp. Finding tapestry too slow, Moorman looked for a less laborious way to weave dense, rich colour and texture.
I’ve briefly used the technique, in a class with Kay Faulkner (blogged 19-April-2010). The photo shows my sample and some notes. I’d like to try using this in parallel with some of the OCA exercises, but it would be additional to the requirements so I’ll have see how time goes.

Moorman’s book is about much more than her technique. There is her personal journey, together with her deeply considered thoughts on weaving as art, the challenges and the opportunities facing the modern textile artist (the book was published in 1975, but most of the ideas seem to me fresh and current). For example Moorman writes of textile artists “almost intoxicated” by the abundance of materials available – natural and manmade, traditional or found – and the need to maintain control lest an “undigested tangle of richness” or “strange and unorganized accumulation of trash” result, rather than the intended work of art (Moorman, page 8).

The design approach discussed includes careful observation, sketching, abstraction. I like the idea of exploiting as positives what could be seen as limitations in weaving – horizontal and vertical lines, imprecise linear patterns etc. I would like to see some of Moorman’s work closeup and in person. There are lots of photos in this little book, but many are black and white and/or distance views.

On Weaving by Anni Albers is another great read that makes me excited about the possibilities for self expression through weaving. Albers describes the history of weaving and the loom. She regards ancient Peru as the most accomplished textile civilization and one recurring theme of the book is that each technological development in looms may provide efficiencies in time and labour, but at the price of limiting the weaver’s freedom, control and flexibility.

Albers presents the fundamental constructions in weaving, and ways of modifying and combining them in limitless combinations. The individual characters of yarns and weave structures work together – or against each other – in the final textile.

This book takes a wide view of weaving, but there is a chapter specifically on tapestry. Like Moorman, Albers does not advocate tapestry as woven versions of paintings. Innovation within the natural discipline of the medium has the potential for expressive, persuasive art.

Although not the focus of the book, I find the illustrations of Alber’s own work very exciting. In the past I’ve tried to supplement my viewing of photos by working in my sketchbook (some examples looking at Sheila Hick’s work can be seen in sketchbook 5, link here). Following my tutor’s comment on not restricting myself to conventional drawing media, I tried extending my original sketch into a small weaving. In the photo you can see an illustration from Albers’ book in the bottom left (“Under Way”, 1963), part of my initial sketch, then on the lower right an attempt at a little weaving based on the original image.

Click on this thumbnail if you want a closer view of my experiment. Of course it’s not right in so many different ways – I won’t even start. On the other hand, my sketch is also very not right. Both helped me really take some time and look carefully at the photo, and a closeup on the next page. While working I kept thinking of Sheila Hick’s small works, almost a diary, trying different ideas and techniques. I’d like to try this sort of thing again.

Albers, A., 1965. On Weaving. Dover edition published 2003, an unabridged reproduction ed. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press.

Moorman, T., 1975. Weaving as an art form: A personal statement. Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd.

Weaving Nancy’s blanket

Weaving content!!

Back here I posted this photo of the blanket on Nancy’s bed at the nursing home and speculated on the weave structure. I thought I’d try it out as part of my development in the final project.

Then I read this post by Noreen Crone-Findlay on her blog Tottie Talks Crafts. She has a super-fast way of putting on a short warp using s-hooks and has some detailed video tutorials, including doing leno (look around at her posts before and after the June one in the link above, as there is a series). Brilliant!

I don’t have that particular kind of loom but the same ideas could be used on almost any, I should think. I decided to try with my Robinson loom, seen here in a photo from February 2010 when I was working on Cacophony. The castle (the high structure that holds the shafts with levers to raise and lower warp ends) can easily be removed, as can the beater, leaving the basic frame with a mechanism for adjusting tension.

Here is the same loom, castle and beater removed, and leno warped and in progress using Noreen’s method.

The closeup shows that as well as my shed stick I used a string and pin setup to keep the second shed. This is another idea from Noreen (here), using a knitting stitch saver instead of a kilt pin. I’ve attempted a slightly different version of continuous string heddles on a stick when playing with backstrap weaving, following instructions by Laverne Waddington (blog backstrapweaving.wordpress.com), but this slightly different form worked well here.

One of the beauties of Noreen’s warping method is that most of it could be improvised using stuff around the home or at the nearest hardware store – for example I used tent pegs for the metal bar supporting the s-hooks (the apron rod was too thick to use the hooks directly on it). Life is easier with a tensioning system, but Archie Brennan’s diagrams show how to manage that with copper pipe and a threaded rod (see his page http://brennan-maffei.com/Loom.htm and scroll down to the “small copper loom” diagram).

In a very short time this afternoon I had this little sample done. I chose a large, coarse string, thinking of the rough and impersonal treatment Nancy has experienced (not the nursing home particularly – the whole situation and sequence of events). It’s actually a single continuous piece of string, used for both warp and weft. There are various tension problems, but that seems to fit with the theme pretty well!

I think I’ve got the structure right.

I’m really excited about the fast sampling this method offers, especially with a weaving project coming up in the OCA course. I think that’s tapestry and experimentation focused, so this could fit. Imagine unhooking a few areas of warp and doing some braiding, or crossing warp ends over to create diagonal elements. Possibilities!!!

 

Contemporary Weave with Liz Williamson

Some images from last week’s class with Liz Williamson, in Mittagong at Sturt Summer School, starting at the end with our final day exhibition.

My 4 Trail Markers on the left. Des's work in black on the right.

Natural dyeing, and tube in fishing line by Des - a brand new weaver.

Chris, also a new weaver, used her own prints and handmade paper

More dyeing and weave from Chris. She picked up the pine needles on a class shopping excursion.

Exciting weft selection from Chris

Mary produced a prototype piece ...

... developing extensive work done previously.

Gail played with colour, texture, openings...

A closer view of some of Gail's work

Susan created a "book" using double weave

Dianne made mobile phone pouches and jewellery. Now you see it...

... now you really see it. The flash doesn't do justice to the subtlety of mother of pearl buttons captured in reflective tape double weave

The weave room

Unfortunately¬†I¬†didn’t¬†get¬†decent photos of the other class members’ work. There were nine of us in the class with Liz, a particularly pleasant and companionable group. Liz provided a really rich and varied learning experience. We examined examples of cloth that interested us – everyone brought some, including heaps from Liz, and talked about how they could be explored or reinterpreted for contemporary designs.

mud cloth

stripes, dyeing, colour

cloth weft and beautiful colour


Liz demonstrating

Liz had a fast way of getting a sampling warp onto the loom, demonstrated various options for warping, gave us extensive notes… but most impressively was able to help two brand new weavers do some really interesting work. Liz gave them just enough theory at each stage for what they were doing, to avoid problems and produce a viable structure while exploring and expressing themselves. Both Des and Chris brought lots of experience in other areas of textiles and creative work, and I think both are now enthusiastic about learning more and incorporating weave into their repertoire.
Liz also organised visits to the weave room by Elisabeth Nagle, a master weaver from Europe who ran the Sturt weave studio for around 50 years, and Melanie Olde who currently teaches there. Plus a number of us sat at dinner with weaver Sally Blake and her fellow exhibitor Vedanta Nicholson following their floor talk at the Rain Gauge exhibition in the Sturt Gallery.
With all that inspiration available, Liz guided each weaver in their own chosen exploration. Many of us used double weave as a structure, but with widely different materials as weft. I decided to challenge myself by avoiding strong colour, instead focusing on texture, light, and shadow. I tried to be really free and spontaneous, exploring the properties of some new-to-me materials – a couple of different paper yarns, cut strips of hessian, garden jute twine, paper rope… I struggled for much of the time, but was very happy and excited by the results. I like the things in themselves, but also that as weaving progressed I continued to learn, to experiment, to examine what happened in one piece and build on it in the next. In the end (!) it was a very satisfying process that I want to continue in my OCA work.
There was one part of the class I didn’t participate in, and I want to write about it here not to get into any big discussion but because in the past I’ve had definite opinions which I’ve later reversed and I’m wondering if this will be another. So to my future self, wondering if one day I won’t believe I thought this… I don’t get natural dyeing and its current huge popularity. Yes, there can be some incredibly beautiful results, but use of synthetic dyes can also give really stunning results – and both can produce blah. It’s the assumption that “natural” dyes are somehow intrinsically gentler on the environment, safer for the user, and generally “better” that bothers me. There may be studies out there which looking at the whole chain of production and use (mordants?, commercial cultivation/production of madder/cochineal/…?, packaging and transport?, …). I don’t know, and in any case as a hobby dyer I suspect the difference would be negligible in comparison to my impact on the environment as an urban dweller who is happy to drive my car around the state going to weaving classes.
Rant over. This was a great week, I really hope to keep in touch with the others in the class because they were an amazing group, and I’m looking forward to seeing influences from the class in my future work.

 

A day in the life of looms

Meg has once again put out a call for photos of our loom(s) and 1st January. Looks like I missed last year, but here is 2010.

Today’s photos are a little sad.

The 4 shaft Robinson table loom still has the remains of the warp from Jason Collingwood’s class in April (blogged here). There was so much more that I wanted to do – but I haven’t touched it since except to take out the reed for a different planned project.

 

 

 

 

 


The 24 shaft Noble has a warp beamed but not threaded, intended for my P2P2 project, and untouched since my last relevant post in September.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally there’s the 8 shaft Ashford table loom. It has some glittery thread on it, intended as part of the PP2 project (I had some complicated plan to handle the two different warps and was nervous about trying to manage the fine glitter on the Noble’s second beam).
On a positive note, this loom will look different by the end of the day, or tomorrow at the latest. I’m off to Mittagong, to Sturt Summer school and a week of weaving with Liz Williamson. I’m very excited, and totally unprepared!

Bead leno detail

With seven wefts tried on my leno sample there was a clear and totally unexpected winner. Which will remain unseen until the Big P2P2 Reveal.

In the meantime I have a few detail shots of the bead leno setup.

In leno warp threads swap positions instead of running along neatly beside each other. Check my photo in this post from February to see a diagram. Back then I used “doups” to get the swapping. This time it’s “beads” – or pieces of a drinking straw in this instance. The first photo shows the setup between the heddles (at the top) and the reed. I used a straight threading for the warp – that is, starting from the right, a thread on shaft 1, the next on shaft 2, then shaft 3, then shaft 4, and repeat in sets of 4 threads, so looking at the loom from the front you have 4-3-2-1 – 4-3-2-1 – 4-3-2-1… Note that each set of 4 go together through a single dent of the reed – very important because otherwise the swapping wouldn’t work.

Here’s a closeup of a 4-3-2-1 group (click on the photo to see bigger). The threads on 4 (beige in this example) and 1 (light blue) are threaded through a piece of plastic straw underneath the threads on shafts 2 and 3 (both dark blue). Underneath – another very important detail. This is still with the shafts behind and the reed in front. (I just put a pickup stick under warps 2 and 3 to make it easier to see.)

While weaving leno the threads on shafts 2 and 3 just sit there – the world revolves around them.

The third photo shows what happens when shaft 1 is lifted. The light blue thread on shaft one goes up (yellow arrow). This pulls on the straw. The beige thread on shaft 4 is pulled over because it is threaded through the same piece of straw. The red arrow points to where 4-beige has been pulled across under the dark threads on shafts 2 and 3 and up. The photo is still between shafts and reed, but in front of the reed the order of threads is now

3 (down) – 2 (down) – 4 (up) – 1 (up)

I put through the weft in front of the reed and that order is captured. Thread 4 has swapped position.

Next (photo 4) I put down shaft 1 and lift shaft 4. The beige thread on shaft 4 goes up (yellow arrow). The light blue thread is pulled across, under the dark threads (red arrow), and up. In front of the reed we have

4 (up) – 1 (up) – 3 (down) – 2 (down)

A pick of weft captures that swap.

Repeat those two picks. The warp threads on shafts 1 and 4 appear first on the right of the group, then on the left, then the right, wobbling their way down the length of the cloth. You can see it a bit on the loom in the last post, but you don’t get the full wobbly goodness until off the loom and wet finished.

I think it’s amazing – magic! Easy to set up, not too tricky to weave. The shed is not as good as standard weaving – after all the warp being pulled across is pulling down on the straw, and also pulling up on the stationary threads as it goes underneath them. Plus in this particular example I am using textured yarn with blobs of cotton and I have to be gentle given the abrasion of all the warps rubbing as they are pulled around. So I am gently separating and spreading the shed with my pickup stick every single pick. This sounds slow, but the main work has already been done automatically by the bead setup and there are so few picks per inch that it’s wizzing along very happily.

Information sources:

  • notes from my weaving teacher, Liz Calnan.
  • “A new twist on Bead Leno” by Kathryn Wertenberger. Handwoven November/December 1989.

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