Archive for the 'OCA' Category



T1-MMT-P5-s7 Reflection – Part 5

Having reached the end of the coursework it’s now time to reflect on this Part and the course as a whole.

Conscious of loose ends (20-Mar-2016), having remained experimental and exploratory, this moment feels anti-climactic. I can’t point at something as the culmination of a year’s work.

What is my final piece?

I started with the idea of a collection of vessels, and there was a deliberate choice (10/1/2016) to take on the challenges of bringing more varied works together in an effective way. I have returned to that choice, questioned it, tested it, many times during the work. I anticipate that exploring the implications around this will be an ongoing strand of investigation and interest.

Reviewing work in previous parts of the course generated a huge number of ideas for potential development. My goals became more focused – using materials already identified, combine ideas from multiple parts of the course, a collection where the whole is more than the sum of the parts, to edit fiercely (18-Jan-2016). I wanted to make the spaces between just as important as the individual pieces.

I found the volume of ideas identified in the review stage almost overwhelming, a feeling that has resurfaced during this Reflection. There are so many leads unexplored, I can feel myself resisting the sweep of the course, the need to tidy up and move on. I want to move In.

Sketchbook work: The sketchbook has been a central element of my work during this Part. I’ve been much more consistent in adding to it and using it to record, to plan, to think. I’ve met my goal set at the beginning of the Part (10-Jan-2016) to step up effort in this area.

There are many examples of ideas captured and explored in the sketchbook which were later developed in samples. For example ideas on page 043, blogged 8-Feb-2016 were realised in sample p5-10 (blogged 14-Feb-2016) and based on earlier research of work by other OCA students. My sample is a woven rather than coiled basket, but materials and the use of heat distortion were as first envisaged.

I need to keep extending the range of media I use in sketching – for example I tend to avoid wet media due to extra time and mess involved. Building signatures of a book as I went will help in binding for submission but reinforces the use of the default white cartridge paper.

Research: In tutor feedback to the previous assignment Rebecca recommended I really pick apart my research material. My research on Gillian Lowndes (26-Feb-2016 and numerous appearances in sketchbook and blog) was pivotal in the approach to the final presentation stage. Her use of space, volume and dynamic line is thrilling. In her work it looks effortless, inevitable, but my inexperience and struggles were very apparent.

I haven’t been able to show the work done to date on Eva Hesse, objects and 20th century art history. Reading progresses on multiple texts – Eva Hesse: 1965; Part Object Part Sculpture; Eva Hesse: One More than One; On abstract art. From a coursework and assessing point of view that’s a problem – there’s been influence on my thinking and making, but I’m not at a stage to make a coherent summary and provide evidence of that. Tant pis. That workstream is ongoing, and the personal value remains.

As well as going more deeply in some areas I’ve continued to look and read widely, but a certain flavour is becoming apparent. Gillian Lowndes, Claire Falkenstein (11-Mar-2016), Eva Hesse, June Schwarcz – strong women, quirky sculptural work.

Taking risks:

Sample p5-4

Sample p5-4

Sample p5-4, inspired by research on June Schwartz, seemed risky, “out there” and unpromising at one point (28-Jan-2016). When recording the sample my attitude to it was ambivalent (31-Jan-2016). Having worked with it extensively later in the assignment I’m amazed now to read my earlier comments – I find it dynamic and exciting, very useful to create movement and links in compositions, and the materials and methods used seem a totally reasonable development of previous work. My appetite and perception of risk seem to have changed entirely.

Sample p5-7

Sample p5-7

Sample p5-7 (14-Feb-2016) is an example of risk layered on risk. It began as sample p3-50, rope encased in plaster. It was “developed” into p3-53 (1-Oct-2015), using repeated throws onto a cement floor. In the current Part the remains were further developed using layers of dribbled resin to create a bowl form (14-Feb-2016).

p5-sketch with 3D pen - sample p5-5

p5-sketch with 3D pen

It could be termed a failure, partly due to technical issues – grainy resin, large sections of plastic mold remain embedded, structurally unsound… but an interesting and different version of the basic vessel shape, full of voids and protrusions. It was later taken still further, “sketched” using the 3D plastic pen (6-Mar-2016).

My post presenting p5-7, 14-Feb-2016, provides a representative mix of risks, successes and failures. There are leaps of development from earlier samples, pushing the properties of my chosen materials.

Sample p5-9 with internal led

Sample p5-9 with internal led

A development of casting plaster in cable knitting led to an exciting sample. Using same fabric and the same glass vessel for a mold as used for the internal shaping in plaster earlier produced a clumsy, static sample in resin with molding materials permanently attached. Some internal lighting saves this sample from complete failure, but it was of no use in the later presentation stage.

Sorting - extended set

Sorting – extended set

Presentation of work: I chose to make presentation of my samples the focus of my “final piece”. This involved a series of photography sessions using compositional ideas developed based on research. In additional to Part 5 samples I felt free to include work from earlier Parts of the course (see Sorting, 28-Feb-2016).

The most influential research was of Gillian Lowndes (26-Feb-2016). A way to get deeper into the research, to pick it apart as recommended by my tutor, was given in a workshop with Ruth Hadlow (25-Feb-2016). The insights gained provided a means of moving beyond the balanced centre-of-the-page compositions I had been stuck on – as noted by tutor Rebecca Fairley.


The transition from Lowndes’s work on the left above to mine on the right looks strongly derivative, but there was actually quite a journey in selecting my background and props, and this was one of many arrangements.

Sample p5-11 series

Sample p5-11 series


Sample p5-14

Sample p5-14

The journey actually started by questioning once again my choice of variety in objects (6-Mar-2016). It then moved on to a very static, centralised arranagement.

Sample p5-25

Sample p5-25

However some combinations of greater interest were achieved, and reflection in the sketchbook helped me move further.

Sample p5-41

Sample p5-41

Sample p5-38 b

Sample p5-38 b

Experimentation included black and white photographs and different viewing angles(12-Mar-2016).

Sample p5-54

Sample p5-54

Works seen in different exhibitions reminded me of the wrapping exercises earlier in the course, and led to another photo variation (18-Mar-2016).

I have printed a number of the photographs on A3 glossy paper for submission to assessors. They look much better in that medium than in blog-sized versions. Recent sketchbook work (not yet posted) has identified the appeal of photographs printed onto watercolour paper and I hope to produce some prints taking advantage of that texture before finalising my submission.

Experiments with video provided another means of experimentation with presentation. Early attempts were focused on recording individual samples – 2-Feb-2016 and 19-Feb-2016. A more ambitious video presented a number of samples arranged in space, 15-Mar-2016. I see significant improvements from each video to the next, the final presentation involving multiple splices of shorter segments of video and a separately recorded narration. There remains a lot of room for improvement, partly related to equipment, software and skills, but also a lighter more fun-filled style may have provided better results.

With that overview I now consider the assessment criteria.

Demonstration of technical and visual skills

Samples p5-4 p5-11 and p5-12

Samples p5-4 p5-11 and p5-12

In this Part I brought forward materials and techniques used throughout the course. This allowed me to use and extend skills already developed. I was particularly pleased with the plaster casting samples which echoed work with corrugated cardboard earlier in the course.

My compositional skills were put to the test in presenting a varied group of objects. Based on research my focus was on asymmetry, on creating a dynamic almost precarious sense. I believe the resulting work shows ongoing development of skill.

Quality of outcome
The use of video has been a valuable addition to my presentation of work. Especially given my interest in more sculptural work, video allows me to give a more complete presentation of the substance of pieces. I hope the narrations also give a better sense of my engagement with the work and the qualities I perceive in the pieces.

This blog remains the main means of presenting my work, and on a personal basis I refer back to it frequently. I post quite often, finding that recording and reflection an important part of my process. In this Part every page of the sketchbook has been shown and commented upon. Initially I wondered if this would be unprofitable double-work, but I have found it a beneficial addition. My hope is that this also improves communication of my ideas and development.

Demonstration of creativity
I have never seen anything quite like my quirky vessels, and I believe they demonstrate an inventive and playful approach to creativity. This course has encouraged experimentation, exploration, risk-taking, and I am personally convinced that I have flourished in this environment.

Rather than looking at particular samples, I believe my growing personal voice is evidenced in my discussion of Loose Ends (20-Mar-2016). There are strands of enquiry, a path of development, I want to pursue.

Context
While incomplete (see Reading below), I believe my research in this Part has been more focused, deeper and more relevant to the work I have been doing. There have been many small influences, an idea here and there (pinterest board at pinterest.com/fibresofbeing/vessels/), and a few major sources that I am sure will continue to inspire me. I feel that my internal artistic life / approach / understanding is becoming richer.

A number of times during this course, particularly when reflecting, I have felt vulnerable, in some way tempting fate by being too pleased with myself. I obviously still feel the need to acknowledge this. But I also have a growing confidence in my self, my work, my path. More on this when I reflect on the course as a whole.

Ongoing Reading

Fer, B. (1997) On abstract art New Haven and London: Yale University Press
Gaßner S., Kölle B., Roettig P. (Eds) (2013) Eva Hesse: One More than One Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz Verlag
Molesworth, H. (Ed.) (2005) Part Object Part Sculpture Colombus: Wexner Center for the Arts, The Ohio State University
Rosen, B. (Ed.) (2013) Eva Hesse 1965 New Haven and London: Yale University Press

T1-MMT-P5-s7 Reflection – Part 5
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Stage 7: Reflection – Part 5

T1-MMT-P5-s6 Loose ends

I’ve reached the end of the time I’d allocated for Stage 6 – Prototype/maquette-making. In Stage 5, Sorting (28-Feb-2016) I set the goal of developing my collection and use groups of vessels in exploring space and presentation. This approach allowed me to keep sampling and exploring right to the end – which in effect makes “end” an inaccurate term.

Rather than “ending” with Stage 7 Reflection, I really want to do another round of Sorting, and then some more Sampling. That’s what this course has been training me to do in my future practice, and fits so well with Ruth Hadlow’s model of practice as a series of strands of investigation, like currents in a river (25-Feb-2016). With on-going exploration / experimentation / sampling in each strand, a particular exhibition represents the state of investigation at that point. Rather than an exhibition I will be presenting the current state of my investigations as part of assessment.

But I’m not finished! This post is to record some strands I want to return to, after all the business of writing up reflections, preparing my submission to tutor, then adjusting as advised for assessors.

Vessels and material exploration: having learnt with Lissa de Sailles to make paper yarn (19-Mar-2016) I am very interested in the possibilities it brings, and started a little basket-based object using some of the plastic horsehair.

Final sample

Final sample

Final sample version 2

Final sample version 2

There are connections to coursework in the plastic, the use of wrapping in the initial version (reminiscent of the wooden spoon shape! 16-Jul-2015), the use of basketmaking techniques seen in final samples (p5-5 31-Jan-2016 and p5-10 14-Feb-2016).

The newspaper yarn brings something quite new.

Final sample detail

Final sample detail

The look is so textile-like! I want to push the millimetre by millimetre deft wrist spinning technique with lots of different materials. So far it’s only been newspaper and copy paper (marketing from an insurance company). What about spinning a painting or drawing? Or… well not for this course. I’ve called it the final sample, but not allocated a number because really it’s the first sample of a whole new exploration.

I’ve already mentioned that research on Eva Hesse is ongoing. It’s not ready for a neat post, so will miss being presented within this course. Related at least in part to that is other reading – Part Object Part Sculpture, edited by Helen Molesworth. I’ve been writing of my work as vessels and objects. What is sculpture, and is that where I’m headed?

This week I saw a work that attempted sculpture using scent – I think. The artist, Dane Mitchell (http://www.danemitchell.co.nz/) participated in a panel discussion and described his work as showing “non-presence”. He explores the senses as a sculptural material, creating objects that take shape in the brain. He’s interested in making tangible, physical, aspects of the unseen. In a sense in the discussion Mitchell kept his scope contained, unlike the more grand responses to the theme Embassy of Spirits (this was all part of the Sydney Biennale). Is there something for me in this???

Other Biennale work was by Jumana Manna and involved film and sculpture (https://www.biennaleofsydney.com.au/20bos/artists/jumana-manna/). I’m hoping to find time to post some brief research on that within this course. My note here is on the combination of multiple media. My photography / video / lighting skills have not given the results I wanted in this part of the course. This is definitely an ongoing strand of learning and exploration.

With that captured for the future, I now feel able to turn to the important business of reflecting on the recent past – Assignment 5, and Mixed Media for Textiles as a whole.

T1-MMT-P5-s6 Loose ends
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Stage 6: Prototype/maquette-making
Loose ends

T1-MMT-P5 Sketchbook update 20-Mar-2016

It’s been a while since the last sketchbook update (27-Feb-2016), although quite a few part pages have been shown with associated sampling/recording work.

p5-sketchpage 061 20160227

p5-sketchpage 061; 20160227


The above page based on work by Eva Hesse appeared at the beginning of stage 6, when I reflected on the power of working with repetitive forms (6-Mar-2016).

p5-sketchpage 062 20160228

p5-sketchpage 062; 20160228

In the same post I showed this work planning some early composition ideas.

p5-sketchpage 063 20160228

p5-sketchpage 063; 20160228

Also in that post was the 3D pen sketch and the simulation of repeated forms. Not previously shown were some tablet-based sketches, done sitting beside a garden waiting for car repair.

p5-sketchpage 064 20160304

p5-sketchpage 064; 20160304

This and the next three pages were recording and thinking of potential developments to my collection photographs, and were shown when recording the original photos (6-Mar-2016).

p5-sketchpage 065 20160304

p5-sketchpage 065; 20160304

p5-sketchpage 066 20160305

p5-sketchpage 066; 20160305

p5-sketchpage 067 20160305

p5-sketchpage 067; 20160305

p5-sketchpage 068 20160306

p5-sketchpage 068; 20160306

I realised that a lot of my attention was being given to the slabs used to provide height and thus precarious situations. Looking for possibilities led to Ursula von Rydingsvard’s work (http://www.ursulavonrydingsvard.net/). Above is a very inaccurate sketch based on a detail of Can’t Eat Black (link).

This helped me to identify my desire for layering with more depth and texture, a need met with broken tiles in concrete (12-Mar-2016).

p5-sketchpage 069; 20160309

p5-sketchpage 069; 20160309

A page throwing around ideas.

Photographing pieces in moving water wasn’t attempted – the setup seemed too difficult and I was concerned about the risk to my equipment. However there was a brief experiment with black and white photography (12-Mar-2016) and considerably more with wrapping (18-Mar-2016).

p5-sketchpage 070; 20160310

p5-sketchpage 070; 20160310

Sketches of p5-39 and p5-42 (12-Mar-2016) helped identify and extract some elements that pleased me.

p5-sketchpage 071; 20160311

p5-sketchpage 071; 20160311

This and the next page were drawn after writing up the second photo shoot (12-Mar-2016) in preparation for the third (written up 15-Mar-2016). I actually took the pages out to the garage with me and referred to them as I was working.

p5-sketchpage 072; 20160312

p5-sketchpage 072; 20160312

p5-sketchpage 073; 20160313

p5-sketchpage 073; 20160313

I mentioned ongoing research of Eva Hesse 6-Mar-2016. A couple of scattered quotes are in the sketchbook as reading continues. This passage linked to my black and white photographs, wondering if the elements of strong colour in my collection were unbalancing or dominating it.

The lower part was working on a photograph – p5-52 – as a way of thinking about what was working and what could be developed. That helped me work on plain paper, trying to extract what I was seeing. A bit more movement, some diagonals, in the main elements could ramp up this image.

p5-sketchpage 074; 20160314

p5-sketchpage 074; 20160314

A step back, looking at the collection as a whole. This is based on a still from the video. In black conte crayon (see note on colour above), I enjoyed exploring the different shapes together.

p5-sketchpage 075; 20160316

p5-sketchpage 075; 20160316

At the top is a collage planning the wrapping of my collection (see 18-Mar-2015), at the bottom one of the wrapped samples drawn in colour pencil.

In the middle is another quote about Hesse, this time about her “thinking about what an object might be”. That question is really engaging me at the moment.

p5-sketchpage 076; 20160319

p5-sketchpage 076; 20160319

Playing around with biro and coloured pencil.

First I drew lines based on the threads wrapping some of the samples. Then I started colouring, with a vague recollection that only three colours are needed to colour a map with no colour the same on both sides of a border. I thought this simplification of the line drawing might reveal an unexpected pattern. It does create some order in what was a chaotic set of lines. This seems quite a good method for beginning an abstract design development, not unlike the design development for printing that I did with Claire Brach (31-Dec-2015).

T1-MMT-P5 Sketchbook update 20-Mar-2016
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Sketchbook update 20-Mar-2016

T1-MMT-P5 Lissa de Sailles basketry workshop

The subtitle for this workshop was Korean hanji paper coiled baskets and it was at a lovely venue in the Royal Botanic Gardens.

Step one was making our cord from strips of hanji paper. Pinch at the right points, a deft twist of the wrist – and you have two ply cord! A tiny amount of cord, but repeat many times and you’ll eventually have a metre or two.

We used waxed linen thread and tried a couple of different stitches to make our baskets.

Class results:

Lissa de Sailles class group photo

Lissa de Sailles class group photo

Quite a variety of lovely small objects.

Lissa de Sailles class 1This is my finished piece – all of 3.4 cm high. The little bobbles on the side were my innovation (in the class – I’m sure I’ve seen such things in the past). This one used buttonhole stitch.

Lissa de Sailles class 2My second piece remains unfinished. This used a whip stitch to create a spiral effect, and I started used a second colour hoping to accentuate the spiral.

A very pleasant day, learning with companionable people in lovely surrounds (my vessel collection could look great photographed in the succulent garden).

spinning carrier bags

spinning carrier bags

For me the big takeaway is the paper cord making. Recently I’ve been paper spinning using drop spindles.

Carrier bags were do-able, if rather large and uneven.

spinning carrier bag and newspaperNewspaper I just couldn’t manage. I tried on its own and a kind of ply with carrier bag, hoping to gain a bit of strength, and it was just nasty. Unusable.

Results using the deft wrist method (I don’t know a formal name for the technique):
spun newspaperEasy. Strong and even (maybe even too even for some applications). I think you can still tell the yarn’s origins.

I have no immediate purpose for this. The original drop spindle work was more avoidance / brain recovery in the final push for the OCA course. Still, I am convinced this is going to Come In Handy.

Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Lissa de Sailles basketry workshop
T1-MMT-P5 Lissa de Sailles basketry workshop

T1-MMT-P5-s6 Wrapping

I’ve written about Mugugalurgarra (conceal) by Jonathan Jones, one of the most powerful and meaningful uses of wrapping that I have ever seen (17-Mar-2016).

A few days after the Canberra trip I was in the Art Gallery of NSW where installation of work by Sheila Hicks had begun in preparation for the Sydney Biennale.

Sheila Hicks Installation in progress

Sheila Hicks
Installation in progress


Sheila Hicks  Installation in progress

Sheila Hicks
Installation in progress

The work itself uses wrapping as a technique, but in these photographs the pieces have additional coverings of heavy plastic. Some appears to be related to transportation, but most was simply protecting the work overnight (I was in the gallery for an evening lecture).

The wrapping mutes the bright colours, makes the shapes more anonymous, more uniform.

Could I use that idea with my collection? I’ve written about the attraction / interest of repetition with slight variations, done a simulation (6-Mar-2016). Could wrapping give an additional level of uniformity, a different way of seeing my objects?

p5-sketchpage 074 20160316 partialI sketched out the idea with a small collage.

As well as providing a different perspective on the collection, I was really attracted to an idea that linked back so strongly to an earlier part of the course.

It was interesting to see my own difference in approach. In the wrapping assignment I simply tried things, experimented. This time I had a goal – present these particular objects differently. It meant I had a purpose in auditioning and selecting materials. I started with the base assumption of heavy plastic, thinking back to work by Christo. It didn’t meet my objective of greater uniformity of objects in different materials and was quickly discarded.

Given the material used in the earlier sketch / collage, I then turned to brown paper. Heavy paper lost a lot of detail of the forms, and I decided that I didn’t want the pieces to become too anonymous. A major point of the vessels was experimenting with space, the positive and negative spaces of the collection, and I didn’t want to lose that. Lighter weight paper could be crumpled (another nice echo from throughout the course), molded around the objects. For binding I chose a hairy linen thread, fairly fine. I liked the lines created in the wrapping – a good balance between distinct but not too intrusive and disrupting the semi-anonymity.

Sample p5-54

Sample p5-54
Click image for larger view

I took 98 photographs and the one above is the best of the bunch. I do not find it interesting or exciting.

Are the surrounds too busy? Is it lack of photography skills? Poor composition? The initial wrapping a bad idea? All these and more?

I like the process from inspirations through to making. I just don’t know how to make the result interesting.

Darn.

T1-MMT-P5-s6 Wrapping
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Stage 6: Prototype/maquette-making
Wrapping

T1-MMT-P5 Canberra exhibitions

Recently I went to Canberra for the weekend, visiting a number of exhibitions.

Tom Roberts The Golden Fleece (1894)

Tom Roberts
The Golden Fleece (1894)

Tom Roberts at the National Gallery of Australia (link).

Roberts (1856 – 1931) is a widely known and loved painter in Australia. He painted country and city scenes, landscapes and portraits. He was versatile, a creative thinker, a leader and mentor among artists. Robert’s paintings are iconic, helping to form national identity, celebrating the country and the people working in it.

More correctly, Robert’s images show one aspect of Australia’s identity. The imagery and the story was very different at exhibitions at the National Museum of Australia.

Encounters: Revealing stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander objects from the British Museum (link).

I was prepared to be angry about this exhibition. Objects acquired often in shady if not always violent circumstances, so deeply and personally important to people living in Australia but destined to return to their “owners”, stored out of sight or displayed for their anthropologic or exotic interest. (I’m a beneficiary of invasion, so yes, glass houses).

The exhibition was different. It was a collaborative project, including research and community engagement. Vibrant, rich, living cultures were celebrated. Individuals and communities were allowed a voice, and given the opportunity to learn about the objects, to reconnect with their heritage. Ongoing pain and sorrow were expressed, as well as celebration and pride.

There’s an associated conference on this week – “explor[ing] how Indigenous communities and museums are re-thinking relationships with colonial collections – questioning and confronting the legacies of colonialism in creative and unexpected ways.” (http://www.nma.gov.au/whats-on/events/new_encounters_conference).

As a textile lover and a maker the ancient and modern objects were fascinating, as were the videos showing recent workshops and teaching events.

So much more positive than I anticipated.

Except… in the end the objects will return to the UK. Maybe there is a will for change, but power remains unequal.

Unsettled: Stories within http://www.nma.gov.au/exhibitions/unsettled

Sited next to Encounters in the Museum was an exhibition of works by leading Indigenous Australian artists responding to Encounters.

Mugugalurgarra (conceal) by Jonathan Jones blew me away (link). Objects from the National Museum’s collection, acquired from his homeland, were wrapped in pages of a 1878 text The Aborigines of Victoria: With Notes Relating to the Habits of the Natives of other Parts of Australia and Tasmania. Jones displayed the wrapped objects in large glass cabinets, historical cases from the Institute of Anatomy.

What an incredible, succinct statement of what was done to his culture. Objects taken, obscured by layers of foreign constructs that were all about western culture, carefully labelled and put behind glass as curiosities.

I would like to think that the National Museum exhibitions are small but positive steps, part of a larger process of grappling with intractable problems. It would be nice to think that precious objects could return to the people to whom they are most precious, who share the value system in which they were created. But those powerful, self-appointed guardians…

Slight change of topic, but I read an interesting article today. What hit home was the expression “unwitting racism”. The real meaning of Rhodes Must Fall by Amit Chaudhuri (link).

Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Canberra exhibitions
T1-MMT-P5 Canberra exhibitions

T1-MMT-P5-s6 Third photo shoot

At the end of the last post I had a plan. To keep myself on track I sketched out some do’s and don’ts.


The next day I went out fresh, set up floor, background, concrete chunks, the best lighting I could manage, took breaks when indicated… Not easy. In the end I got two photographs which approach what I was looking for.

Sample p5-52

Sample p5-52
Click image for larger view

The photo is a larger size than usual, so you can see the textures if you wish. I’m very happy with the mix of textures, the mix of materials. There’s asymmetry and I see the tilt of the plaster vessel first. It takes some time to see the slightly precarious situation of the other vessel.

Sample p5-53

Sample p5-53
Click image for larger view

I was interested in coming right out of the picture towards the viewer, but I’m not convinced by this photo. To me it’s a positive that my eye doesn’t move around smoothly – that fits with the idea of teetering, off-balance. It would be better if the top slab was tilted, as if about to tip off to the left. There’s actually just of sliver of light visible, but too subtle.

Next I went back to the concept of a pile of objects, experimenting with space.

I am ambivalent about this video. Hopefully it gives an idea of the space created, the interaction of different pieces. I see more when I watch it again – for example in a section on glorious failure I see orange in the object, picked up from other pieces nearby. I think the environment and props enhance the collection.

On the other hand the video itself is poor quality, the picture shaky, transitions clumsy (I pieced it together from a dozen shorter videos filmed). I believe it is as good as I could achieve with current expertise, my tablet, domestic lighting, and free software.

Overall valuable experimentation.

T1-MMT-P5-s6 Third photo shoot
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Stage 6: Prototype/maquette-making
Third photo shoot


Calendar of Posts

February 2020
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
242526272829  

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Archives

Categories