Archive for the 'MMT 5 – Exhibitions workshops etc' Category

T1-MMT-P5 Exhibition – 20th Biennale of Sydney – partial view

This post about the current Biennale of Sydney is partial in that I’ve only visited a couple of the sites so far, but even more because I am anything but an impartial viewer. Everything I see is through the lens of my own recent work, considering alternatives, possible future options. Such bias feels uncomfortable – I feel partly closed to entering another’s view of the world. Is it to an extent a good thing – a personal voice, a personal perspective, isn’t that what I am meant to be developing as an artist? Whichever, clearly it’s something I need to work through.

Jumana Manna Installation view

Jumana Manna
Installation view

At the Art Gallery of New South Wales A magical substance flows into me is a 70 minute HD video with sound by Palestinian artist Jumana Manna. It’s a complex compilation based on research into broadcast music recordings from across Palestine in the 1930s. Manna documents playing these recordings to musicians across the country, asking them to perform in response. She “investigat[es] the spiritual nature of music and its capacity to shape both identity and cultural and religious rituals” (from gallery signage). I’ve watched sections of the video during different visits and what struck me was the personal nature of the footage, often in domestic settings, the intensity and interest of the musicians and their joy in performance.

Jumana Manna

Jumana Manna

Jumana Manna White elbow

Jumana Manna
White elbow

The video is shown in a space that includes a number of sculptural works by Manna. This untitled collection of sculptures, made of plaster, pigments and laquer, are domestic in scale. They are strangely familiar in form – dried gourds perhaps, or human lungs. Empty containers that would resonate, like a musical instrument, like a human body. To me there’s a sense of the domestic, the hospitable, in providing an installation with inbuilt padded seating.

There is variation in shape and colour of the sculptures, but connections in line and material. There are similar forms in different colours, for example the double lobed form that is reminiscent of body parts. The grouping is varied but cohesive. As can be seen in the installation view there are two larger sculptures, separated in space, size and the inclusion of additional found elements, but clearly connected.

The installation brings the viewer in, a participant in the journey of discovery through a divided land where music knows no boundaries.

Manna’s work is in the Art Gallery of NSW, the biennale’s Embassy of Spirits. The following two artists are being exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Embassy of of Translation.

Nina Beier Installation view

Nina Beier
Installation view

Two works by Nina Beier can be seen – Allegory of Charity and Tileables. Tileables are the ceramic squares seen on the floor in the photograph above and are based on textures developed for 3D modelling software. Allegory of Charity is a group of works showing coffee cups suspended in the air, a stream of coffee beans apparently pouring from them.

Nina Beier

Nina Beier
Allegory of Charity (detail)

Beier examines the translation between objects and image, taking stock images of mass produced products and recreating them in three dimensions. This could be viewed as the opposite of my recent work, where highly individual three dimensional works were created, then transformed into images using photography. Particularly in the black and white photographs and those of wrapped objects, the individual nature of the objects was in part repressed.

Beier’s individual elements are repetitive with slight differences. Most obviously the coffee cups are different sizes and shapes. However all the cups appear to be commercially mass produced. The impact of the familiar object reminded me of observations in the workshop with Ruth Hadlow (25-Feb-2016). I took inspiration from drawings by John Bokor, whose work appears firmly located in the domestic and familiar. My own layered drawings included some of my collection of objects – not at all familiar or ordinary. At the time I asked where can ordinary lie. Beier has taken something very ordinary, impersonal, trite, and turned it into something unfamiliar, surreal.

Dayanita Singh Kitchen Museum (detail)

Dayanita Singh
Kitchen Museum (detail)

Dayanita Singh Kitchen Museum (detail)

Dayanita Singh
Kitchen Museum (detail)

Dayanita Singh has an extensive photographic archive, built up over more than 30 years. Here Singh presents some of these in “mobile museums”, travelling to different locations, with a unique selection and display at each venue, the series of photographs open to a unique interpretation of meaning or narrative by each viewer.

Dayanita Singh Suitcase Museum (detail)

Dayanita Singh
Suitcase Museum (detail)

I don’t see the overall idea as new – Duchamp’s Boîte-en-valise comes to mind (I’ve seen the version at the National Gallery of Australia). At a very different level my weaving Cacophony traveled Australia as part of ATASDA‘s The Maharajah’s Garden suitcase exhibition (5-Feb-2010).

Singh’s two collections are beautifully presented, a series of moments that had me looking at details, wondering about other places and lives.

Bringing it back to my current obsession, an accordion fold book of my collection photographs could be an effective way of making a final presentation, a sense of completion to my final work. It even has that lovely reference to the very first sample done for the course. I have a skype tutorial coming up in a few days, so can discuss the idea with Rebecca then.

Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Exhibition – 20th Biennale of Sydney
T1-MMT-P5 Exhibition – 20th Biennale of Sydney – partial view

T1-MMT-P5 Exhibition – The Charged Object

The Charged Object: soft sculpture and the aesthetics of touch
Gallery Lane Cove
(online catalogue)

This was a fascinating exhibition given my own collection of vessels and the ongoing research on objects. In this post I will only discuss a few of the exhibitors.

JohnBrooks Transgenesis

JohnBrooks
Transgenesis

John Brooks Transgenesis

John Brooks
Transgenesis

John Brooks’s installation included handwoven lengths and a projection. It was arranged to create a cave-life effect for the viewer. The video was reminiscent of B-grade science fiction movies, shambling bipeds moving through a rocky terrain.

Of interest to me was the use of weaving – a technique I am keen to return to. The viewing screen was reflective tape including an a weaving, which also incorporated a fur-like effect similar to the bipeds’ costumes. The combination of textiles, video and performance was very effective.

Nicole Monks Sheemu

Nicole Monks
Sheemu

Nicole Monks  Sheemu

Nicole Monks
Sheemu

Nicole Monks also used performance and video in her work. The sculpture was made from wool and feathers, an amalgam of sheep and emu, introduced and native species respectively. It was animated through performance in the videos, set in a woolshed and in the Australian bush. Sound was important, grating machinery contrasting with bird song. The videos were strangely static, but the installation combined to give a dischordant, unsettling effect.

The video and sculpture were less integrated, felt a little more clumsy than Brooks’s work, where any clumsiness seemed a deliberate choice.

Brett Alexander

Brett Alexander

Brett Alexander Hang up(s)  / Pink is for ...?

Brett Alexander
Hang up(s) / Pink is for …?

Brett Alexander’s group of works may appear less relevant to my own work. Although three dimensional they were displayed mainly flat along a wall of the gallery with no additional multi-media element. I am particularly interested in how cohesive and yet how varied the collection was, given my own challenges with a wildly varied collection.

All the works shown used circular knitted yarn, hung to form narrow verticals with many variations in the detail. The palette was restricted, mainly pink, red, grey, black.

Alexander explores identity, challenges the feminisation of textiles. The works have a visceral quality and are often sexually charged.

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Overall lessons for me are to keep working on video and to keep thinking about what a collection of objects could be. Alexander’s group suggests that there can be a lot of variation between works while still maintaining unity. It’s not a simple repetition | individualistic dichotomy.

However another revelation is that some of my collection, with suitable scaling and development, would not appear out of place in this exhibition. There’s the question of the focus on soft sculpture while most of my textile work was hardened in resin, but I think that would provide an interesting counterpoint, especially given the clear textile genesis. In a very haptic exhibition there was no touching – requiring firm self-discipline and losing part of the essence of “soft”. I could play with how much and where I used the resin. I also think some of my pieces show a response to gravity, an important element in Claes Oldenburg’s work (which was referenced via a quote from Celant in the exhibition. See my brief comment on Oldenburg’s work 7-Feb-2015).

I’ve had pieces that were minor elements in ATASDA‘s non-juried exhibitions. I’ve never before thought that my work could bring an interesting additional element to an exhibition like this.

Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Exhibition – The Charged Object
T1-MMT-P5 Exhibition – The Charged Object

T1-MMT-P5 Lissa de Sailles basketry workshop

The subtitle for this workshop was Korean hanji paper coiled baskets and it was at a lovely venue in the Royal Botanic Gardens.

Step one was making our cord from strips of hanji paper. Pinch at the right points, a deft twist of the wrist – and you have two ply cord! A tiny amount of cord, but repeat many times and you’ll eventually have a metre or two.

We used waxed linen thread and tried a couple of different stitches to make our baskets.

Class results:

Lissa de Sailles class group photo

Lissa de Sailles class group photo

Quite a variety of lovely small objects.

Lissa de Sailles class 1This is my finished piece – all of 3.4 cm high. The little bobbles on the side were my innovation (in the class – I’m sure I’ve seen such things in the past). This one used buttonhole stitch.

Lissa de Sailles class 2My second piece remains unfinished. This used a whip stitch to create a spiral effect, and I started used a second colour hoping to accentuate the spiral.

A very pleasant day, learning with companionable people in lovely surrounds (my vessel collection could look great photographed in the succulent garden).

spinning carrier bags

spinning carrier bags

For me the big takeaway is the paper cord making. Recently I’ve been paper spinning using drop spindles.

Carrier bags were do-able, if rather large and uneven.

spinning carrier bag and newspaperNewspaper I just couldn’t manage. I tried on its own and a kind of ply with carrier bag, hoping to gain a bit of strength, and it was just nasty. Unusable.

Results using the deft wrist method (I don’t know a formal name for the technique):
spun newspaperEasy. Strong and even (maybe even too even for some applications). I think you can still tell the yarn’s origins.

I have no immediate purpose for this. The original drop spindle work was more avoidance / brain recovery in the final push for the OCA course. Still, I am convinced this is going to Come In Handy.

Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Lissa de Sailles basketry workshop
T1-MMT-P5 Lissa de Sailles basketry workshop

T1-MMT-P5 Canberra exhibitions

Recently I went to Canberra for the weekend, visiting a number of exhibitions.

Tom Roberts The Golden Fleece (1894)

Tom Roberts
The Golden Fleece (1894)

Tom Roberts at the National Gallery of Australia (link).

Roberts (1856 – 1931) is a widely known and loved painter in Australia. He painted country and city scenes, landscapes and portraits. He was versatile, a creative thinker, a leader and mentor among artists. Robert’s paintings are iconic, helping to form national identity, celebrating the country and the people working in it.

More correctly, Robert’s images show one aspect of Australia’s identity. The imagery and the story was very different at exhibitions at the National Museum of Australia.

Encounters: Revealing stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander objects from the British Museum (link).

I was prepared to be angry about this exhibition. Objects acquired often in shady if not always violent circumstances, so deeply and personally important to people living in Australia but destined to return to their “owners”, stored out of sight or displayed for their anthropologic or exotic interest. (I’m a beneficiary of invasion, so yes, glass houses).

The exhibition was different. It was a collaborative project, including research and community engagement. Vibrant, rich, living cultures were celebrated. Individuals and communities were allowed a voice, and given the opportunity to learn about the objects, to reconnect with their heritage. Ongoing pain and sorrow were expressed, as well as celebration and pride.

There’s an associated conference on this week – “explor[ing] how Indigenous communities and museums are re-thinking relationships with colonial collections – questioning and confronting the legacies of colonialism in creative and unexpected ways.” (http://www.nma.gov.au/whats-on/events/new_encounters_conference).

As a textile lover and a maker the ancient and modern objects were fascinating, as were the videos showing recent workshops and teaching events.

So much more positive than I anticipated.

Except… in the end the objects will return to the UK. Maybe there is a will for change, but power remains unequal.

Unsettled: Stories within http://www.nma.gov.au/exhibitions/unsettled

Sited next to Encounters in the Museum was an exhibition of works by leading Indigenous Australian artists responding to Encounters.

Mugugalurgarra (conceal) by Jonathan Jones blew me away (link). Objects from the National Museum’s collection, acquired from his homeland, were wrapped in pages of a 1878 text The Aborigines of Victoria: With Notes Relating to the Habits of the Natives of other Parts of Australia and Tasmania. Jones displayed the wrapped objects in large glass cabinets, historical cases from the Institute of Anatomy.

What an incredible, succinct statement of what was done to his culture. Objects taken, obscured by layers of foreign constructs that were all about western culture, carefully labelled and put behind glass as curiosities.

I would like to think that the National Museum exhibitions are small but positive steps, part of a larger process of grappling with intractable problems. It would be nice to think that precious objects could return to the people to whom they are most precious, who share the value system in which they were created. But those powerful, self-appointed guardians…

Slight change of topic, but I read an interesting article today. What hit home was the expression “unwitting racism”. The real meaning of Rhodes Must Fall by Amit Chaudhuri (link).

Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Canberra exhibitions
T1-MMT-P5 Canberra exhibitions

T1-MMT-P5 Ruth Hadlow – Articulating Practice workshop

The full title of this weekend workshop was Articulating Practice: exploring the interior terrain, and the first sentence of the description on the ATASDA website “The subtle slippery nature of generating ideas, their development and transformation into objects, images, words and forms is difficult to describe, express or even have confidence in, and yet it is the core of artistic practice.” We would be examining – mostly talking around – strategies of creative practice.

I’m still processing the two days dense with ideas – this is not a polished post, more teasing out a jumble of interlocking strands.

Starting points – points of reference; what interests you, what attracts your attention (magnetic).

Exploring, unpacking – not committing to a single direction early.

Model of practice: not discrete bubbles of separate projects. A series of strands of investigation, like currents in a river – although not a progression. A strand may start, fade, join with other strands… Go where-ever I am most engaged at the moment.

Key areas of practice – reading; writing; analyzing / attentive looking; making.
Ruth sees all parts of life as part of her practice – the key areas above, plus gallery “work” (using the key areas, and a research project in itself), library “work” (ditto), and lived experience (some parts more potent than others, but in theory including washing dishes).

The core is attentive looking and analyzing.
Close looking:
– Registering (scan and select)
– Paying attention (screen out distractions – the glass bell; sketch and record – drawing and writing, eg form, materials, associations)
– Analyzing
 —Subjective first – what is attracting my attention; what can I bring to my practice; avoid getting stuck in the literal or derivative; using language helps attract, analyse attention.
 —Objective less important – type; history; context; biography. Information that has authority, certainty, categories, boundaries is not useful to my practice.

Drawing: a verb, not a noun. Provisional, propositional. Avoid default behaviours – insides of envelopes instead of white paper, scissors instead of pencil. Use to advance very attentive looking.

Writing: a vehicle to a more attentive practice. A place to unpack stories, narratives and ideas; to play with structure and forms; to engage with ideas. Take time to make notes. Clarify. Push further.

Reading: forage – chapters here and there; multiple books on the go; making new connections. Focus on one chapter – what really attracts interest.

Everything is brought back to your own work.

Ruth gave extended examples of how attentive looking and analyzing works. Focus on exactly what attracts your attention. Ideas generated by Matisse wall cutouts: not framed, provisional, scale, loose repeat of pattern –> a lot of licence –> tear rather than cut so less controlled, less contrived –> recognise interested in negotiating a terrain of uncertainty. This led to work by Sally Smart – what attracted, what changed / extended. Led to William Kentridge – torn paper on a ground.

Another sequence was on drawing and doodling, and Ruth took us on a path through artists showing her chain of thought and interest, one thing leading to or building on another.

Once you’ve identified interest in a territory, start adding more examples. Translate materials or contexts – responding to, not replicating

Ruth is interested in the sets of rules or processes that artist set up – maybe working in timed sessions, feel versus look etc. These rules or brief determine the outcome of the investigation. The internal logic gives terms for personal critique.

Be your own best critic: not the default inner critic (negative), but your own best critic – was I engaged (even if work was “easy”) or was I being lazy? Did I meet the brief I drew up?

One suggestion was to try a related exercise over a month. It can develop an interest, build to a project, it might surprise, be an enjoyable process. A clear brief can be reshaped. The idea is to engage the creative mind, focus attention, respond, build, recognise links… As it builds up a new project may eventuate, and all start to build up a life of the mind. We can turn our passions into research settings, and all into ongoing exploration.

Ruth is constantly sampling, and often sampling becomes the work. Sampling avoids predetermining the work. But always ask: Am I playing it safe?

John Bokor Kitchen table

John Bokor
Kitchen table. 2011. Pencil, gesso wash on thick textured white paper (oil paper)
http://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/collection/works/362.2012.3/
Click image for larger view

After a lot of talking we tried to use some of the ideas. When preparing for the class I chose John Bokor as a contemporary drawing practice that interested me. I’ve written about him previously in the context of still life (31-Jan-2014).

The class task:
– Make a list of what attracts my attention. It may be easier to start by listing what you see then identifying those key points.
– Write a brief for a drawing exercise based on that. Based on interests, then take that information and play it out separately and differently.
– Use chosen object as subject matter or to inform the drawing brief.
– Bring in some lightheartedness – this is an experiment.

While working on this task I realised that my interest was being attracted by some specific works by Bokor, so I focused on those. My initial list:
overlapping/layering of image; domestic scale; life as it happens; simple lines, complex image; charcoal, gesso; depth, not flat pattern; looks like fast work – a captured moment; provisional, not definite; sense of movement; life was happening as he worked; no directional lighting; structure – basic perspective; space between – positive and negative space lock together in pattern.

I note the ideas of captured moment and provisional. A definite strand of ongoing interest there.

My edited list of what is attracting my attention: layering of image; captured moment [–> work quickly] [–> multiple sessions]; simple outlines.

My brief for an exploration: Use a small group of items (not a single one – I wanted space between). Three timed 2 minute sessions. Brush down sketch between sessions.

Variations noted were same arrangement; changed arrangement; changed objects.

Sketch objects

Sketch objects
Click image for larger view

My selected objects were samples p3-33, p5-4, and a prayer wheel brought by another student.

For the first sketch I changed the arrangement after each session and worked in charcoal in all layers.

Sketch 1-3

Sketch 1-3

This sketch has much of the energy, movement and sense of the moment that had attracted me.

For the second sketch I kept the same arrangement in each session, but ignored the traces of earlier layers as I was working.

Sketch 2-3

Sketch 2-3

Sketch 2 is much more static and uninteresting.

Sketch 3-1

Sketch 3-1
Click image for larger view

I’d just started sketch 3 when Ruth arrived for our one-on-one. The idea for this set was to use three different colours of conte pencils. I was limited in the sketch materials I’d brought, and thought this could make an interesting variation.

One note was the three colour idea. Using similar media would limit the range of mark-making. Ruth suggested trying a range of media – say pencil, conte and charcoal.

We also discussed “ordinariness”. Clearly I wasn’t looking at well-known domestic objects – but these are objects that currently fascinate me and that I want to work with. Where else could “ordinary” lie? In media used or support (Ruth is very encouraging of moving away from the default white paper). Perhaps draw in tea or coffee.

Ruth also focused on p3-33, one of my “glorious failures”, and suggested exploring further with lots of small variations – shapes in different plastics, working at different temperatures, recording in sketch or photo. All of this, in fact much of the course, was very close to the OCA structure I’ve been following. Research, sample, record, sort, lots of reflection. Good reinforcement, and also good to see it from a different perspective.

Sketch 4-3

Sketch 4-3
Click image for larger view

The group critique came soon after. There was just time for a very quick attempt with different drawing media – pencil (3H), conte pencil and charcoal.

This final sketch is not satisfying, the different media interacting to muddy the image. However the group made some interesting suggestions about playing with which medium is dominant, putting some shading and variation in tone and mark, and anchoring the objects in a space. Ideas I’d like to follow up that were raised as we moved around the room were varying scale (the drawing we were looking at was a brown paper background with white and black chalk over. What about fine black ink and white chalk pastel?). If you find/feel a frustration try to recognise and name it –> new ideas. Working in the round, not on a flat surface – a cylinder of acetate or paper draping in the hand. Drawing with stitch and collage. Pushing pencils, working while standing. Overlapping and rearranging paper surfaces. Drawing with a stick and ink.

As mentioned above a lot of the course resonated with me because of the parallel with Mixed Media for Textiles. I realise on reflection that Ruth has given me a way to continue that exciting ride out of the college context, making my own briefs rather than relying on course notes.

There was another class exercise, working with a contemporary art practice, but that leads to my next post – research on Gillian Lowndes.

Later edit: I realised I’ve written about Ruth and her work a couple of times previously – in the context of the proppaNOW collective (5-Jan-2014), and a talk she gave at COFA (20-Sep-2013).

T1-MMT-P5 Ruth Hadlow – Articulating Practice workshop
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Ruth Hadlow – Articulating Practice workshop

T1-MMT-P5 Graham Marchant – Exploring Mixed Media workshop

Last week I went to the Mitchell School of Arts summer school in Bathurst. Over two hundred people spent the week there, creating, learning, and talking about creating and learning.

My workshop was with Graham Marchant, a very experienced artist and teacher, who draws, paints (oils and watercolours) and prints. Graham has given me permission to include some images of his work here.

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The slideshow above includes one of Graham’s large watercolours. It includes a length of draped fabric – a frequent feature in his work, the folds created using a lengthy process including layers of glazes which he demonstrated during the week. There is also a sliver of window, what Graham described as an exit of the picture, and a favourite compositional device. With my current preoccupation I note the painting includes an eclectic collection of vessels.

I’ve also included two lino cuts. The coloured one used multiple blocks, out of scope for the workshop but it’s interesting to see similar ideas in a different medium. Quite a bit of of class time was spent working with lino cuts.

See Graham’s website for more information and images – http://grahammarchant.com.au/

The class description offered printmaking and further layered processes including collage and painting media, using our own drawings and photographs as source material.

banded ironstone formation

banded ironstone formation

Print p4-162

Print p4-162

I worked with an image from my Broome to Perth trip, the same banded ironstone formation I used in the last assignment (30-Dec-2015 and 31-Dec-2015).

There were eight in the class and we began with a large (around A3) lino cut, but after that Graham supported each of us in developing our own path. My lino cut went through a series of states and refinements, with final prints on 300 gsm (I think) German Etch and a rice paper.

class print 1

class print 1

class print 2

class print 2

Print 1 was the German Etch, printed using a press. Print 2 on rice paper was made using a baren and wooden spoon. Both used black Schmincke linoprint ink. Although the heavy paper is beautiful and use of the press allows a solid transfer of ink I think the variation in the hand pressed version is a better match for my subject.

class oil pastels

class oil pastels

I used one of my state proofs as the base for some work with oil pastels. I was feeling a need to break out of the monochromatic!

class drawing 1

class drawing 1

class drawing 2

class drawing 2

class watercolour test

class watercolour test

I started planning a more detailed watercolour and began with a couple of pencil sketches, trying to clarify the broken rock layers. Graham suggested that we use the same source for multiple interpretations, really getting to know and understand the image. The complex movement of the banded ironstone was forgiving in one sense – who would know if my interpretation was wildly inaccurate? I found it challenging, but by the end of the week I was able to see more and more.

At my request Graham gave an extended introduction to basic watercolour techniques. The little square shown here was one of my samplers, working with colours and lines that could be useful in my picture. Reminder to self – I’ve since realised I should have included the technique of random splattering masking fluid with a wash over, for a nice rocky/crystalline effect.

class collage

class collage

In the event I didn’t get to use most of the ideas. I used some 300gsm Arches medium texture watercolour paper, around 57 x 51 cm. The underlying thought was to used mixed media to present multiple views at different scales in a single work. After a base layer of watercolour mulberry bark was glued to the page to suggest the rock bands. More colour was added, plus some mottled baking paper from the natural dye day last year (4-Apr-2015). In the final moments some grasses were added in an attempt to pull the page together. There wasn’t time for the detailed painting or perhaps drawing I intended. At the moment I think it was a mistake to put colour on the mulberry bark, as I’ve lost the lovely sheen. I’m out of ideas currently, so this might stay as an unfinished exercise.

Back home today I wanted to try printing the lino block using my own resources.

home print 1

home print 1

Carbazole violet Akua intaglio ink was rolled on and the print taken on cartridge paper using a baren. Graham did one print like that in class, basically to show us that you can’t get a quality print on even medium weight paper without a press. It’s not necessarily an issue in this current course, as printmaking is only one step in the creating process, but I’m planning to follow up on some possibilities to get occasional access to better equipment.

home print 2

home print 2

The second print was on rice paper. The colour is still patchy and light, but there is a soft, atmospheric effect on this thin paper. I think this is the most successful print of the block, although that’s not so clear in this photograph.

The lino block is larger than my gelatin plate, so only part of the image is included in the final prints.

home print 3 detail

home print 3 detail

home print 3

home print 3

First I rolled the gelatin with a mix of pyrrole orange and red oxide Akua liquid pigments. The uncleaned lino block was pressed in, then a print taken on cartridge paper.

The colour is not sympathetic to the image and my hand pressing of the lino block was uneven. There is some lovely crisp detail of the cutting, and the incidental marks work well for the subject matter.

home print 4 detail

home print 4 detail

home print 4

home print 4

Again with no cleaning, I rolled a mix of lamp black and red oxide onto the gelatin. Only a few drops are needed, but I accidentally used more. I pressed the lino block into the gelatin using an mdf board to ensure pressure over the full area.

The lino lifted off with a squelch due to the excess of ink. The overall picture is lost in all the incidental marks, but there is some lovely patterning at the detail level.

home print 5 detail

home print 5 detail

home print 5

home print 5

I rolled on a smaller amount of ink in the same colours. The print is still not clear. I will probably use this technique again, but on a slightly smaller scale.

All this detail on the physical products of the week doesn’t do justice to what was a great experience. Graham was a generous, knowledgeable and thoughtful tutor, with lots of little tips and insights as well as the major demonstrations. The class was diverse, and the discussion and sharing in the group was both enjoyable and instructive. It’s going to take a little time to rebuild energy – it was exhausting mentally as much as anything – but I’m hoping to see ongoing improvement in my sketchbook over coming months.

Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Graham Marchant – Exploring Mixed Media workshop


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