Archive for the 'MMT1 – Sketchbook' Category

T1-MMT-P1 Sketchbook – delayed

I started this sequence of work 23rd April (dated by photos and Evernote), three weeks ago. Are my notes good enough to pick up the thread?

It began with reviewing work to date. I decided to work with some of the samples in my sketchbook.

First “rubbings” of a range of them, using rice paper and conte crayons.

Photo 1

Photo 1

It started with the pink in the middle (from felt sample p1-68), which I thought was uninteresting, then got worse.

Decided to treat it as background texture, and rubbed over with a paper towel to blend it in.
Very little moved.

Drew over with inktense pencils, based on sample p1-75.

Photo 2

Photo 2

Then tried to move colour around with water.
It didn’t look promising, so went to one side to dry.

Next idea was to draw one of the samples in 3D. I really wanted to get the sense of all the movement and cells in the original sample (p1-62), but take advantage of the pen by adding some extra dimensionality. I traced over the general shape first (baking paper between), then embellished.

Photo 3

Photo 3

Photo 4

Photo 4

I can see the relationship, but quite different too.

Then I tried using the 3D pen on a piece of polymorph (part of sample p1-5, that reformed during a demo to a work colleague). I tried to play up to the accidental orchid reminiscent shape.

Photo 5

Photo 5

Photo 6

Photo 6

The filament feels quite well attached, and it was quite straightforward to add a sketchy line tracing along one part of the edge, and a more lacey effect on the lip.

What would happen if I remelt the polymorph?

Photo 7

Photo 7

The polymorph softened, but the pink from the 3D pen was not affected at this temperature.

I formed the familiar simple fold.

Photo 8

Photo 8

The pink filament formed clumps.

I worked to spread out the clumps.

Photo 9

Photo 9

A resemblance to sample p1-75 suggested itself.

Photo 10

Photo 10

The backlit view has a spiderly effect.

Writing the above has been a good test of my current note-taking system. The ricepaper inktense drawing above has now dried and looks perhaps slightly improved, although still extremely boring. My intention before the long pause was to combine it with the “3D sketch” produced above.

Photo 11

Photo 11

The drawing was torn and soaked in a bowl of diluted pva.

Photo 11

Photo 11

The pieces layered onto to plastic sketch.

Photo 12

Photo 12

The result was a soggy mess.

Photo 13

Photo 13

I tried to turn it over, thinking to encase the plastic in paper – but of course the paper just fell off. No photos – I was too busy dealing with the mess.

A couple of days later it was dry.

Photo 14

Photo 14

It took some effort finding shadows to give any definition in the photo above. Patterning on the paper interacts with the shaping of the work in a deadening way.

Photo 15

Photo 15

The view from the other side has the advantage of the plastic which provides a tiny bit of form, a path for the eye – but it’s marginal.

Photo 16

Photo 16

Photo 17

Photo 17

The backlit views make the work more readable, but at the price of losing all the 3D aspects which first interested me.

Photo 18

Photo 18

There was no adhesion between paper and plastic. The plastic is quite brittle, and in a couple of places the paper had caught around it. I was able to separate them with just a few breakages.
I wonder if a series would work – make a single plastic item, mould over and break off repeatedly, with the cast paper forms capturing the gradual disintegration of the plastic.
The paper cast is fairly firm. I think if cut in stripes they would hold shape, but the whole thing wouldn’t resist a rolling pin for long.
Perhaps because the pva was well diluted, the paper retains a papery feel. In further experiments it might be interesting to write on it or colour it – perhaps some shading to emphasise the heights and valleys.

Photo 19

Photo 19

I prefer the backlit view of the paper on its own, compared to Photo 16 above where the plastic was still in place. Photo 19 is a detail, but it’s cleaner and crisper.
It could be interesting to follow a similar process but use writing on the original rice paper. Perhaps some text about a place or an event in a location, broken and layered over a relief “map” of that location. A hill that was the focus in a military campaign is the first rather obvious thought.
Print photos on the paper? (don’t know how the printer would like this particular paper, or the paper behave with the printing ink).
I just poked a pin through the paper form. One could stitch through it, although care would be needed in handling to avoid breaking down the form. Or maybe a collapsing shape could be part of the point.
What about the crossing of the great dividing range? Use imagery on the paper to show the different views of the European explorers and the original inhabitants, views that break, merge, overlap… Maybe some text from reports – I wonder about the range of recognition / inclusion in newspaper or official reports of the interactions or involvement of aboriginal people. Mix it all together, stitch some lines showing various paths or views…

Taking a step back from these ideas, I note that while I enjoy exploring the qualities of materials I often come back to wanting the results to mean something. A recent article on www.textileartist.org/ presents the work of Collette Paterson – www.textileartist.org/collette-paterson-oca-textiles-tutor/. Paterson is an OCA tutor, amongst many other work roles and ventures. Her work is strongly materials-led, within varying constraints of commercial briefs or desired outcome or product. She will sometimes follow the properties of material exploration, or select materials that have properties desired. All sorts of skills and techniques are used to create an innovative design. A commercial product. Do I have an artificial and probably snobbish and unhelpful divide in my mind? My initial reaction to Paterson’s work is “this is great, but not the path I want to take”. Why should I limit my paths (note the plural)?

T1-MMT-P1 Sketchbook – delayed
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 1: Surface Distortion
Sketchbook

T1-MMT-P1 Sketchbook

With little in my sketchbook so far this course, I thought it would be interesting to revisit some samples and use them as drawing tools. What more would I discover about them?
Sample p1-15 (30-March-2015). Can I capture the shapes formed when crumpling by using it to print on paper?
First a general crumple, and blue.
2015-04-17_01
Recrumpled and some ribs added. Tore the paper slightly where it was damp. Need to be careful.
2015-04-17_02
Rolled on some red.
2015-04-17_03
Actually it was two lots of red – the first was rather dark, being mixed with the blue.
Wanting the crumpled paper to last for a few more prints, I spread it out to dry for a while.
2015-04-17_04
I like it more in real life, where it’s easier to see the dimensionality of the page, which lets the paint distribution make more sense somehow.
The next was meant to be lots of little sub-peaks. It gets harder and harder to see the form as more chaotic colour is applied.
2015-04-17_05
Golden yellow applied, again in two lots with the second a clearer colour.
2015-04-17_06
2015-04-17_07
I don’t feel this is getting anywhere. It’s all a bit muddled and formless. The blue looks out place. It could be used as a background element, adding a bit of texture and interest without fighting for attention.
Wanting to push a bit further, rather than just moving on to the next thing. How to add something coherent? I thought of the linear accordion folds. Wandered on to Blue Poles (see 26-December-2013).
Try for lines, not entirely parallel, in a dark blue-black.
Page folded
2015-04-17_08
After rolling on the paint I pulled the folds out, to get positive and negative areas in the printing.
2015-04-17_09
Dreary. The page was underneath the crumpled paper as I was rolling the paint, and the edge parts are stronger than the print itself (of course!), destroying any sense of order. Overall I got some OK textures, but not the history of a sequence of events that I wanted.
2015-04-17_10
The crumped paper is more interesting, at least in areas. The colour is stronger, and the slightly more formal patterning in the final dark layer.
Almost all the colour is on one side. I noted this as I was working, but didn’t try to control it one way or another. Looking at areas within the page there are a few with attractive colour mixing and/or patterning.
I ironed the crumpled paper, with the ideas of clarifying the patterning produced and that there was potential to use the paper elsewhere – for example suitably strengthened with medium of some kind it could be used on book covers.
2015-04-17_11
2015-04-17_12
There is still physical texture. The paper feels more stable and usable. I don’t think it could stand up to stitching, plus at the moment can’t think of anything it could enhance or to enhance it.
Next I wanted to try the old classic of the rolling ball, but using my filigree ball of plastic (see 16-April-2015). Considered using a different background, but wanted to get a general idea of the effect first, so continued to work on A3 cartridge paper.
Black paint applied with a brush, and ball rolled over paper.
2015-04-17_13
O dear. More paint on my hands than the paper.
I added some red paint to the tray, and applied it by rolling the ball in it.
I have a photo of the result (of course!), but there’s so little change it’s not worth including.
Some scarlet paint added, then dipped ball into paint and directly dabbed onto paper, rolling slightly but with hand pressure ongoing.
No improvement, so no photo.
Added golden yellow. Left it in a thick blob on the tray and dipped the ball in, pressing down and rotating in place. Then did the same press and rotate on the page, concentrating on spot areas.
2015-04-17_17
Not thrilled, and couldn’t see a way of taking it forward. Might try some computer work on it later.
Annoyingly, the next idea came as I was cleaning up. So back out with some paint, this time using some random bits of leftover plastic as stamps.
Again, disappointing at first. I tried a few more bits.
2015-04-17_19
I’ve arrowed the most interesting bit, plus the plastic fragment that made it.
Overall a disappointing session, but important in that at least I’m back to it.
Later I played around on the computer. The result I liked best:
2015-04-17_20
T1-MMT-P1 Sketchbook
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 1: Surface Distortion
Sketchbook


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Fabulous figure sculpting workshop with Kassandra Bossell!

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