Archive for the '1.6 Personal extension' Category

T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project overview

Some background: there was a period at the beginning of the year when I was between OCA courses, waiting for the new Mixed Media for Textiles (MMT) to be finalised. I had a high level outline and draft reading list, so I started reading and experimenting. In early March I took an evening class in 3D printing, with the idea it was bound to be useful in MMT at some point. I’ve continued experimentation based on that class, often closely entwined with the MMT exercises. Eventually I decided there was sufficient mass and relevance to present it as an extension project.

Referring back to the course Introduction to this Part:

  • I’ve used a range of ways to manipulate materials new to me to discover their creative potential.
  • I’ve expanded my knowledge and understanding of them, and have further ideas.
  • I’ve used the same working practices as with the formal exercises.
  • It’s not precisely surface distortion, where a previously flat surface is distorted. Instead with 3D printing I can directly create a distorted surface. As it happens this fits rather well with my textile interests, where I focus on creating fabrics with weaving and felting.

    I’ve even been able to extend (!) sketchbook work, drawing with a 3D pen.

    To see all blog posts which relate to this extension click here.

    Some samples with particular interest or potential:

    Sample p1-38

    Sample p1-38

    fuse_plastic_47Sample p1-38 (10-April) was in a sense a sketch exploring the contours of a crumpled paper exercise by tracing with a 3D pen.
    The resulting network of lines could be regarded as a new distorted surface, although a discontinuous one. sketch20150514-03In later sketchbook work I made a tracing of a different sample, then attempted to create a skin using rice paper. (16-May) The result for the plastic wasn’t exciting, but the paper cast had potential.

    Sidetrack p1-1 Result

    Sidetrack p1-1 Result

    My sample numbering system has fallen apart with the late addition of this extension. Not wanting to go back and renumber everything, “sidetrack p1-1” shows the control gained using kinetic sand as a mould. Again it could be argued that the bowl that results is not strictly a surface, however I think the human eye and mind will read it as such. There is a lot of potential here for both creating and embellishing distorted surfaces, although attachment to other materials remains a challenge.

    Sidetrack p1-3 Sideview

    Sidetrack p1-3 Sideview

    Sidetrack p1-3 (16-April) is more solid and introduces colour variety. There is definite potential here, although a thinner sample when tested proved quite brittle and broke up under only mild pressure.

    Polymorph plastic is a very exciting material. It worked well with embossing (one of the formal exercises I didn’t attempt), although printing from the result didn’t go entirely smoothly.

    Sidetrack p1-13 Ribs

    Sidetrack p1-13 Ribs

    Sidetrack p1-13 (21-April) shows a version of linear accordion pleats (project 1, exercise 1) created from plastic pellets. This sample also shows the strong colour than can be achieved using disperse dyes on the plastic.

    In a different sample adding glittery inclusions to the polymorph plastic also worked well. I ended that day’s work session with a list of more experiments I would like to make.

    Sample p1-130c

    Sample p1-130c

    3D software provides another way to create distorted surfaces. In sample p1-130 (9-May) the surface is virtual, but there is the potential to develop it and print it out as an object for its own sake, or as a mould to create further shapes in other materials.

    Sample p1-131dSample p1-131eNot all the virtual samples could be printed into physical form. Sample p131 views d and e would be challenging to produce. They do suggest possibilities in concealing and revealing meaning. Could one create a “forest” that reveals a text as you walk around it?

    Sample p1-132e

    Sample p1-132e

    Sample p1-132e (9-May) is pure fantasy – I don’t believe it could be printed and hold together as an object. It was created by a series of distortions of a plain virtual cube, to me a clear extension of the surface distortions of the course exercises.

    "Sketch" Photo 6

    “Sketch” Photo 6

    A final example of the potential available. This sample was included in a post on sketchbook work (16-May) and combines both polymorph plastic and drawing with the 3D pen. The base shape was formed from a flattened piece of melted plastic, and in terms of basic process is close to the crumpled paper exercises in project 1. There was very good adherence of the two forms of plastic. I wasn’t able to separate them in later manipulations.

    3dplastic_15There is a gap in what I am able to show here – a sample actually produced on a 3D printer. The one experiment I have, combining a lithophane drawing with felting (6-April), is an example of what not to do. The combination of materials and processes I chose whas not successful and there are no direct potential next steps from this. I remain convinced of the basic potential of combining 3D printing with textiles – but this particular attempt is a dead end.

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project overview
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 1: Surface Distortion
    Project 6: Personal extension

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project: Autodesk 123D design

    Meshmaker (see 9-May-2015) seemed a good place to introduce computer-based design because it feels flexible and responds so directly to input. The various brushes and other tools are grouped under “Sculpt”.

    Autodesk 123D design (free download http://www.123dapp.com/design) feels more engineering like.

    Sample p1-133
    I started with some simple text – two dimensional.

    Sample p1-133a

    Sample p1-133a


    Next the text was selected, copied and pasted, and the new 2D text was moved above the original text.
    Sample p1-133b

    Sample p1-133b


    In the centre I’ve circled in red the controls that came up when moving – arrows allow me to move the text on x, y or z axis (which could be described as left/right, forward/back, up/down). There are also circular controls for tilting. Circled on the right is a place to type in the value you want – the precision I was talking about. On the left I’ve put an arrow to show where I’ve moved the new text upwards.

    Didn’t go as planned.
    Sample p1-133c

    Sample p1-133c


    Above I used extrude to go from 2 to 3 dimensions – but not the way I had in my mind.

    Sample p1-134
    Simpler solid shapes – a cube, and a cone that I have rotated.

    Sample p1-134a

    Sample p1-134a


    I used the Loft tool to join them together.
    Sample p1-134b

    Sample p1-134b


    I undid the Loft and sketched a new enclosed shape with Spline.
    Sample p1-134c

    Sample p1-134c


    Didn’t go as planned.

    Sample p1-135
    I have no clear idea of how I produced this. A range of new videos watched, walking away in frustration now and then, a cube swept along a spline curve, a corner tweaked, a boolean merge with a rectangular prism, and another edge (or possible vertex) tweaked. At least I now have an irregular, non-standard solid.

    Sample p1-135a

    Sample p1-135a


    Sample p1-135b

    Sample p1-135b


    Sample p1-135c

    Sample p1-135c


    I suspect this could almost be printed – although that lovely slit window thing would probably be a snag. Still, I have achieved a Something.
    Views a – c above are the same solid from different directions. View d below:
    Sample p1-135d

    Sample p1-135d


    A circular pattern of Somethings!
    Sample p1-135e

    Sample p1-135e


    Another perspective.
    Next turned upside down, lots of little tweaks, and a change of materials.
    Sample p1-135f

    Sample p1-135f


    I save in STL file format and opened it in Meshmixer.
    Sample p1-135g

    Sample p1-135g


    Wow! That looks different.
    But I haven’t been able to edit it. I think I’ll have to start simpler – another day.

    Overall I haven’t got as far as I’d hoped with this. Remembering my early days in other software – say when learning Gimp – I think I’ve made an OK start. No need to focus on the long road ahead 🙂

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project: Autodesk 123D design
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 1: Surface Distortion
    Project 6: Personal extension: Autodesk 123D design

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project: 3D design and printing

    Throughout this Part of the course I’ve been doing little explorations with 3D printing, “drawing” and polymorph plastic. To me they all fit into Mixed Media and into Surface Distortion. Exploring some 3D design software reinforces this. It challenges me to think in three dimensions, to explore space. It could generate ideas that could be developed in many ways (like any sketchbook). The results may be able to be printed off and then incorporated directly in work or used as a mould.

    The first software I’m working in is Meshmaker (free download from http://www.123dapp.com/meshmixer). With a couple of classes with MadMat and a few youtube tutorials under my belt, time to explore.

    Sample p1-130
    I started with a flat Plane, and used an Inflate brush to create some ridge lines. The response reminded me strongly of the earlier work with crumpled paper.

    Sample p1-130a

    Sample p1-130a


    I can change viewpoint to see the result from different angles.
    Sample p1-130b

    Sample p1-130b


    It’s bigger on my screen – some detail has been lost creating the screenshot.
    I can zoom in.
    Sample p1-130c

    Sample p1-130c


    View c shows the triangles which make up the surface. More triangles will be added (like more creasing of the paper) if needed as the shape is pulled around, or if I add them with the Refine brush.
    I can remove extraneous details of printbed, grid and faceting.
    Sample p1-130d

    Sample p1-130d


    Adding colour makes it a bit clearer.
    Sample p1-130e

    Sample p1-130e


    You can see how shadows change as I view the object from different heights and directions.

    I crashed the program.

    Sample p1-130f

    Sample p1-130f


    Which had auto-saved my lovely edge distortions! I still haven’t figured out how to get holes in the fabric.

    The experimentation with different brushes and associated parameters got a little out of hand.

    Sample p1-130g

    Sample p1-130g


    Sample p1-130h

    Sample p1-130h

    Some strange, diseased coral perhaps.

    Sample p1-131
    I started with a simple cylinder solid, which I shaded with a brassy looking finish, just because I discovered how to.

    Sample p1-131a

    Sample p1-131a

    Made it hollow and generated some holes. (Now I’d stopped trying!)

    Sample p1-131b

    Sample p1-131b

    Cut off the top.

    Sample p1-131c

    Sample p1-131c

    Next I tried to emboss some writing (embossing is another of the standard exercises)…

    Sample p1-131d

    Sample p1-131d

    … and on changing view discovered things aren’t always as they seem!

    Sample p1-131e

    Sample p1-131e

    Some quick un-do’s, and another attempt.

    Sample p1-131f

    Sample p1-131f


    Better???

    Another go and it’s more what I originally planned…

    Sample p1-131g

    Sample p1-131g


    … and rather boring in comparison to the earlier surprises.

    Sample p1-131h

    Sample p1-131h


    A wobbly handle completes a dysfunctional mug.

    Sample p1-132

    Sample p1-132a

    Sample p1-132a


    A fresh start with a simple solid.
    Proportions are changed, and a mesh of tubes subtracted to create an open grid structure.
    Sample p1-132b

    Sample p1-132b


    The top surface is dragged in a spiral.
    Sample p1-132c

    Sample p1-132c


    I like the view from other angles – below and the side.
    Sample p1-132d

    Sample p1-132d


    I have an ongoing fascination with boundaries, the juxtaposition of order and chaos, the accommodations made at transition points.
    Wanting to make more dramatic and dimensional changes, I used the Volume, Spike brush with a large size.
    Sample p1-132e

    Sample p1-132e


    Sample p1-132f

    Sample p1-132f


    Sample p1-132g

    Sample p1-132g


    From a number of angles the result is reminiscent of a bird in flight, very dynamic (and totally by chance).
    Sample p1-132h

    Sample p1-132h


    It is very pleasing that underneath the structure – the dna? – is still evident.

    T1-MMT-P1-p6 Personal extension project: 3D design software
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 1: Surface Distortion
    Project 6: Personal extension: 3D design software


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