Archive for the '1.1 Folding & crumpling' Category

T1-MMT-P1-p3-e1 Fusing plastic – second session

My previous session (8-April-2015) gave some basic familiarity with the idea of fusing layers of plastic to create a material suitable for stitching or other uses. Time to go a bit further.

Sample p1-25. Three layers of carrier bag, 1 layer fruit bag mesh, 1 layer clear polythene (perhaps – I really don’t know my plastics.) Very roughly 16 x 21 cm

Sample p1-25.

Sample p1-25.


Sample p1-25.

Sample p1-25.


Nice gridded texture. Polythene on front worked well – forms a seal, holds things in. I like the combination of bag pattern and mesh.
Minor distortion in mesh. Can I take advantage of that?

Sample p1-26. The same layer sequence, in an improvised anchoring system.

Sample p1-26.

Sample p1-26.


Sample p1-26.

Sample p1-26.


Sample p1-26.

Sample p1-26.


Some distortion of grid. Might be able to get more with an assistant to hold things.
Good “frill” effect at the end. Some distortion of the base – it will be interesting to see if the bond holds over time.
I can image a form of clothing -say a skirt, with frill and openness at the hemline.

Sample p1-27. Bubble wrap (quite small, thin bubbles) sandwiched between single sheets of carrier bag.

Sample p1-27.

Sample p1-27.


The bubble wrap has been hanging around a while and must have been more popped than I realised. I only heard one pop while ironing – thought it was more pressure than heat – but there is definitely a spacing in the pattern embossed on the surface. Could something be done with that?
The other side:
Sample p1-27.

Sample p1-27.


You might be able to see some cracking in the white of the plastic. It seems to be cosmetic only. Heat? Stretching as the bubble expanded?

Sample p1-28. I found some fresh bubble wrap and pierced some holes (dots of colour to make it clearer).

Sample p1-28.

Sample p1-28.


Hmm – did that without thinking which side will show best. The more bubbly side is up in the photo.
A single layer of bag either side – black so my dots wouldn’t show.
Sample p1-28.

Sample p1-28.


Not good definition on this side.
Sample p1-28.

Sample p1-28.


The photo is tricky, but there is definitely contrast in texture on the other side – unfortunately the writing is mirrored!
A closeup to show the contrast, which I think is very effective.
Sample p1-28.

Sample p1-28.

Sample p1-29. A different approach to texture. I have a plastic grid, which I’ll protect with baking paper. Then a rather crispy carrier bag with spots (to go with the square grid) and four layers of the standard carrier bag.

Sample p1-29.

Sample p1-29.


The flaw in the plan soon became obvious! I couldn’t iron both sides and keep the grid in place.
A metal grid would be a better idea, carrying the heat through.
As it was –
Sample p1-29.

Sample p1-29.


blah!

Sample p1-30. Going back to a previous idea.
This time a hessian grid – quite soft and open, from a garden supplies store. A thin pink plastic one side (I think it was a hotel laundry bag) and two layers of carrier bag on the other.

Sample p1-30.

Sample p1-30.


Interesting things happened while ironing!
Sample p1-30.

Sample p1-30.


Some nice embossing on the carrier bag side. I’d like to try distorting the grid of that open weave. The other side –
Sample p1-30.

Sample p1-30.


Basically no adhesion of the plastic, which distorted and went lacey in an intriguing way.

Sample p1-31. Following up the weave distortion idea, I cut a new piece of hessian and pulled it around.

Sample p1-31.

Sample p1-31.


I chose two layers of carrier bag on one side, one on the other to see if the embossing differs.
Sample p1-31.

Sample p1-31.


How disappointing!
Sample p1-31.

Sample p1-31.


Marginally less disappointing (a vanishingly small margin!)
Sample p1-31.

Sample p1-31.


Backlighting helps. Colour in the plastic could be good too.

Sample p1-32. Returning to that thin pink plastic, I decided to pre-shrink it. (I haven’t been keeping track of dimensions and shrinkage, as it seemed pretty uniform for everything else, but the cutting mat is shown here)

Sample p1-32.

Sample p1-32.


Sample p1-32.

Sample p1-32.


Not promising, but for the sake of the experiment I kept going, with a single layer of clear polythene each side.
Sample p1-32.

Sample p1-32.


Not easy to back light well, but this could actually have promise! Flat on the table it was very drab.

Sample p1-33. More trapping in polythene. A test of thicker materials some – game counters.

Sample p1-33.

Sample p1-33.


The day is getting old so I decided to push a bit harder – counters, feathers and rubber bands between single sheets of thin polythene.
Sample p1-33.

Sample p1-33.


It looks a bit like a bad shower curtain, but it survived!

Sample p1-34. For this I have to backtrack to work done at the beginning of the day, when I was collecting plastics together.
I wanted to make a woven mat of plastic filament to trap between plastic layers. Experimenting with short lengths I realised the filament was too inflexible and too set in a slight curve to manage. I tried pre-shaping parts, using the 3D pen. This is back to accordion pleats, introducing flexibility of a sort.

Sample p1-34a and b.

Sample p1-34a and b.


Initial positioning:
Sample p1-34c.

Sample p1-34c.


It might look a bit crazy, but I am an absolute believer in this. Not the detail, but the overall idea of using the knowledge and skills and techniques from one area and trying to apply them in another. I think that’s the way to develop one’s own work – bring all of your history to bear on the present, not to stifle things but to take them further, in your own direction.
Plus look at the surface distortion! Can I stabilise, perhaps add a surface skin to this?
I picked out the supports and wriggled things around.
Sample p1-34d.

Sample p1-34d.


Not flat, not hugely 3D. I love the way it’s hard to follow a line – a combination of order and chaos – but I also wonder about mixing colours.
Surely I can “trap” this somehow.
It intrigues me.
After consideration, I decided another colour would make the structure clearer.
Sample p1-34e.

Sample p1-34e.


Sample p1-34e.

Sample p1-34e.


At the end of the day I brought out this weaving and ironed it between 1 layer of white carrier bag and 1 layer clear polythene.
Sample p1-34f.

Sample p1-34f.


Another idea that “needs more development”. It stabilised things, but flattened them. No point in that!

(Sidetrack) Sample p1-35. Disappointed, it was time for something completely different.
I went back to the crumpling exercise, using baking paper.

Sample p1-35.

Sample p1-35.


Can I record that in plastic?
Sample p1-35.

Sample p1-35.


Not that way. The hot filament just skidded across the paper, not taking on any of the distortion.

Sidetrack Sample p1-36. Could I support the filament better? I filled a tray with damp sand and pressed the paper shape into it.

Sample p1-36.

Sample p1-36.


Sample p1-36.

Sample p1-36.


The hot filament still came out too quickly, even at the slowest setting, and didn’t settle into the shapes in the sand.
Sample p1-36.

Sample p1-36.


It was a plastic shape, but didn’t tell the story of the paper.

Sidetrack Sample p1-37. Another attempt in the sand tray. I tried to build up a base grid of contour lines, which later lines could attach to and stay in place.

Sample p1-37.

Sample p1-37.


Very approximate.
Sample p1-37.

Sample p1-37.


Not what I was looking for.

Total sidetrack. I needed to build skill with the 3D pen.
fuse_plastic_40
Lots of “not what I was looking for”.
Youtube had the answer. I had been extruding the hot filament constantly. It was going all over the place while still pliable and not holding shapes as I wanted. On the videos people just paused the stream briefly while a short section of filament cooled. A little more, then pause. and again. A lot more control.
I made myself a name plate.
fuse_plastic_41
All of this was build 3D, not flat and assembled. It was either attached to the worksurface or I was holding the work in my hand. I only worked on the flat when putting the letters together.
fuse_plastic_48
fuse_plastic_42
Not a thing of beauty, not well controlled – but with at least some control, and Proper (in my mind) 3D.

Sidetrack Sample p1-38. Back to crumpled paper.

Sample p1-38.

Sample p1-38.


Sample p1-38.

Sample p1-38.


The lines follow the contours of the paper. I am ridiculously pleased.
Sample p1-38.

Sample p1-38.


Sample p1-38.

Sample p1-38.


Sample p1-38.

Sample p1-38.


It’s wobbly and a bit frail, but it was what I was looking for.
Why am I so pleased?
Because I didn’t find it easy but I got there.
Because it’s a fairly accurate record. It goes back to my attraction to traces, memories, shadows.
Because I see it as a new form of sketchbook work (and I need to do more of that). I felt just as conscious and observant and absorbed by the shape as I would be if sketching on paper. I learnt more about the shape, examining it closely as I moved the pen around.
I like the thing itself. There’s a squiggly, lacey, delicate air about it. It almost looks beaded. The shape is interesting and the shadows cast add complexity.

T1-MMT-P1-p3-e1 Fusing plastic – second session
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 1: Surface Distortion
Project 3: Heating and fusing
Exercise 1: Fusing plastic

T1-MMT-P1-p1 Folding and crumpling roundup

Part of managing my time on this course is moving on when I don’t feel finished.  So here are brief notes wrapping up, at least for now – there’s always the hope of more time later.

Grace Tan http://www.kwodrent.com/index.php is an artist suggested in the course notes. It’s easy to see why in her earlier work – piles of folded paper in Utterubbish (2007), folding and pleating leading into manipulation of strips in specimens (2008 – Commissioned for 8Q-Rate: School). Works evolve, method progresses through samples, reduction of complexity — simplicity. There is a fabulous snake of pleats flowing around a dress-form at http://www.kwodrent.com/index.php/site/projects/1 – “non-wearable textile composition based on arithmetic and number pattern.” Her more recent work is mainly installations  and architectural. An example is Building as a Body (2012) http://www.kwodrent.com/index.php/site/projects/61 where a veil of strips of material (? a plastic) reveals and conceals the facade of a building.

I didn’t see a connection to pleating and accordion folds in those strips until seeing something quite different – the new Barak building in Melbourne- see for example http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/william-barak-apartment-tower-portrait-revealed-20150303-13t31e.html. There is a lot to be uncomfortable about in the depiction of an Aboriginal elder’s face on an appartment block built on appropriated lands. For my current discussion, the point is the use of shadow lines with building (balcony) lines to form an image. In a similar way Tan’s strips work with shadows to create “pleats”. There is less weight, manipulation of the “surface” is more flexible, air and sight can move through – but it is still a development of the folding experimentation. (Note: great example of development process to consider in my own work).

Caroline Broadhead presents crumpled clothing – or at least crumpled shapes that suggest the form of the body and could be used as clothing. She is exploring space and boundaries, creating atmospheric works that tug our emotions.
See http://onviewonline.craftscouncil.org.uk/4040/object/T137
http://www.arts.ac.uk/csm/people/teaching-staff/textiles-and-jewellery/caroline-broadhead/
http://www.themaking.org.uk/content/makers/2009/11/caroline_broadhead.html

Christine Mauersberger, in particular Timelines (2014). Sewn strips of Rubylith form a distorted surface. This is process-based work, developed from mark-making in her sketchbook. “The drawings and stitched work developed an interdependent relationship where one informed the other. This activity placed me on a trajectory of purposeful artwork.” “The way I connected to discovering my voice was to be vulnerable to taking a risk. ” (from http://www.worldofthreadsfestival.com/artist_interviews/128-christine-mauersberger-14.html (Accessed 5-Mar-2015)). Another great example of working process and approach, useful to consider for myself.

Artists on http://www.le-crimp.org/
– Vincent Floderer http://www.le-crimp.org/spip.php?page=visionneuse&id_article=2&id_document=212 and much more. Radial pleating/crumpling taken to an extreme. Great use of colour and lighting.
– Romain Chevrier http://www.le-crimp.org/spip.php?page=visionneuse&id_article=13&id_document=255 – some strange animal’s trail through the sand
– Alain Giacomini http://www.le-crimp.org/spip.php?page=visionneuse&id_article=25&id_document=382 Swooping bird-like forms or graceful flying fish. Again the drama of lighting.

Jade Pegler http://folio.jadepegler.com/projects/books-and-sculptures/ A wide variety of paper work, including examples incorporating pleating.

20150101aMy Indigo Sketchbook post (9-January-2015) includes work done before starting this course, but certainly under its influence and using one of the recommended texts – “Folding Architecture: Spatial, Structural and Organizational Diagrams” by Sophia Vyzoviti.

20150101eI was particularly interested in the memory of folds, the traces left behind. It’s a bit like stains on worn clothing, or tracks on sand that get swallowed up in the next tide – a memory, a ghost. Perhaps nostalgia for a lost opportunity. It seems there can be so much more emotion in fragile reminders – linking back to Caroline Broadhead’s work.

A little bit of pleating work I wanted to take further:
Claire (https://tactualtextiles.wordpress.com/) lent me a pleating device.
pleat_01
I decided to play using layers of tissue paper.
Sample p1-19. Pleats are formed by pressing material into a grove with a plastic card. Two cards leapfrog each other, forming a pleat then holding it in place while the next pleat is formed. I found the light tissue pleats kept popping out. Luckily my party picks are just the right size to hold things in place.
pleat_02
… which inevitably led to the problem of fixing and removing the pleats.
pleat_03
I used a sticky paper tape
pleat_04
Sample p1-19a. Soft folds formed.
pleat_05
Sample p1-19b. which I creased in a pattern.
pleat_06
Sample p1-20. Wanted to use the fixing tape as an advantage. Chose two colours of tissue paper, hoping for interaction.
pleat_07
The first layer of tissue. I like the pattern of the sticks holding the pleats, plus the totally accidental match of tissue length to pleater.
pleat_08
Double-sided sticky tape down the centre, and I pressed the pleats in place.
pleat_09
Sample p1-20a. Then purple, fixed using the other side of the tape. I flattened the purple – should try leaving it rounded another day.
It’s like inside-out corrugated cardboard.
pleat_10
Finally, I played with different arrangements.

Sample p1-20b.

Sample p1-20b.


Sample p1-20c.

Sample p1-20c.


Sample p1-20d.

Sample p1-20d.


Sample p1-20e.

Sample p1-20e.


Sample p1-20f.

Sample p1-20f.


Sample p1-20g.

Sample p1-20g.


Sample p1-20h.

Sample p1-20h.


There could be lots of ways to explore this further – different colours, different pleat spacing (you don’t have to use every slot) or even on flat paper, more layers of pleating, longer lengths…
Note also possibilities of popcorn fabric.
Finally my recent natural dye day (hosted and masterminded by Claire) involved lots of accordion pleating – see 4-April-2015 for more. This leads back to the idea of traces and shadows left, rather than the original.
Clamped

Clamped


Result

Result

T1-MMT-P1-p1 Folding and crumpling roundup
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 1: Surface Distortion
Project 1: Folding and crumpling

T1-MMT-P1-p1-e5 Basic crumpling technique in Canberra

This weekend just past I was in Canberra for the annual two day walk (link), so OCA work had to fit in where it could. On balcony of our apartment, I took some inspiration from a nearby tree – lovely surface.
crumple_02
I started with A3 bank layout paper and crumpled as hard as I could.
Sample p1-13.
crumple_03
Time passed (an afternoon stroll), then following the basic instructions in the course notes, I opened the paper about half way.
crumple_04
and repeated the process a few more times, introducing new creases and opening to a smaller size each time.
crumple_11
Sample p1-13a. Paper prepared, experimentation can begin. First a single rib.
crumple_12
Sample p1-13b. Then re-crushed, and a series of ribs opened out – a couple of photos below. It looks quite different from different angles.
crumple_13
crumple_14
I checked the notes and realised I should have been sketching – had to go digital, as nothing else with me. Clearly I’m at the low end of the learning curve with the software, but the exercise made me focus on edges, the textures of the crumpling itself, and the way light played on the surfaces. It was absorbing, changing colours and brush textures, size and opacity, as I tried to build up the image.
crumple_15
Sample p1-14. I moved to an A3 sheet of 80 gsm graph paper, crumpled and ribbed. I expected the distortion of the grid to enhance the crumpling. Not so much. The paper itself was a bit soft and started to develop holes fairly quickly, and the scale and colouring of the grid just got lost. It’s just not as different and interesting as I’d hoped.
crumple_16
The work was quite interrupted – I was travelling with others, catching up with friends… I was not feeling as positive about this exercise as I expected.
I’m following a path laid out too closely, not exploring, no flow.
Next day…
Sample p1-13c. Re crumpled my original page and tried my earlier tree inspiration.
l used a knife handle to form the “backbone”of the palm frond. The paper had a natural curl, so I went with that to choose the “top”of the frond.
crumple_17
Disaster! I formed my palm frond, but left for the day’s walk before taking a photo. Got back – and the housekeeping service had taken my crumpled paper palm frond!!! How could anyone not immediately recognise the nature of the crumpled paper as a specific, intended design? It was nowhere near a bin… I went to Reception and tried to explain the difference between crumpled waste paper and crumpled paper sculpture. I was surprised by my attachment to the single page that had accompanied me through my explorations.
Sample p1-15a. I crumpled a new palm frond. I really like the way the paper naturally curves as you form it.
crumple_18
Sample p1-15b. Next was moulding over a glass. It suggests lots of vessel possibilities, especially if one later used some kind of coating treatment (something to explore).
crumple_19
Turning the shape around, drawing edges (and trying not to look at the screen). I was surprised by the variation in edges – little straight bits where crumpling was less dense, movement up and down, in and out as the paper overall distorted.
crumple_20
Sample p1-15c. Then I moulded it over a different object.
I’ve seen/read about the impact of colour in recognition of shapes, so offer some alternative views.
crumple_27
It was of course a banana.
crumple_28
Sample p1-15d. What about this one?
crumple_29
Sample p1-15e. It’s slightly clearer when I wore (old) glasses.
crumple_30
Back home, I was keen to get to kitchen and the aluminium foil.
Sample p1-16. Using a piece roughly A3 in size, the initial crumple:
crumple_31
It was very hard to unwrap with tearing – I wasn’t entirely successful.
crumple_32
Sample p1-16a. I decided one round of crumpling was enough for a start, and went for multiple ribs.
crumple_33
Sample p1-16b. It’s exciting how well the foil holds shape, so I added some waves – which were entirely lost visually.
crumple_34
Sample p1-16c. Perhaps smoothing on the folds so that there was a clearer difference in texture would help… Yawn. Not enough.
crumple_35
Sample p1-16d. Then a simple mould around a glass.
crumple_36
I am convinced there are possibilities here, but I’m not reaching them. Perhaps a heavier gauge foil would be better. I’ll return to this later.

Sample p1-17. Going back a bit to the graph paper that was blah, I tried a stronger pattern – some Christmas wrapping paper, around A3.
crumple_37

The crumpling. By the end any gloss of the cheap paper was gone.
crumple_38
Sample p1-17a. This time I tried for a spiral folding. As I was working the soft paper seemed to be losing all its creases, but when put on the work surface it is quite 3D.
crumple_39
crumple_40
Sample p1-18. I wondered if the initial crumpling was really making a difference on this paper. I cut a fresh piece and tried a spiral fold. Conclusion – the crumpling does make a difference!
crumple_41

Finally, working on these projects has sharpened my eyes. Some pleats and surface folds seen while walking in Canberra.
The paving around the lake.
Canberra_surface_01
The surface of the waters.
Canberra_surface_02
The roofline of the National Portrait Gallery.
Canberra_surface_03
The Cascade Waterfall by Robert Raymond Woodward AM, leading up to the High Court.
Canberra_surface_04

T1-MMT-P1-p1-e5 Basic crumpling technique in Canberra
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 1: Surface Distortion
Project 1: Folding and crumpling
Exercise 5: Basic crumpling technique

T1-MMT-P1-p1-e1 Linear accordion pleats continued

My initial post for this exercise was 23-March-2015. That used a single A4 page of white printer paper. Time to explore wider. I started with the idea that folding damages the material.

My work notes:
Sample p1-2a. Cut some white crepe paper to roughly A4 size.
Folded in roughly 2cm folds-as for previous sample. Hard to get a crisp fold. Pleated paper sits softly on the worktop.
accordion_11
Sample p1-2b. Easy to tie in a knot.
accordion_12
Sample p1-2c. Unknotted & tried to stretch along folds, then realised I had cut with the grain going the wrong way. Retied the knot and stretched ends across the folds. Looks a bit like a bow on present wrapping, but I think it is a good distortion.
accordion_13
Sample p1-2d. Untied knot and stretched across the folds a couple more times. More interesting in the photo than on the work surface, as shadows are more pronounced.
accordion_14
Was trying to add some more random stretches when I tore the paper. Crumpled it up in disgust before remembering to document.
Sample p1-2e. There’s something attractive about the torn edge and shadow line at the front, also the central tear creates an interesting gap.
accordion_15
Sample p1-3a. Cut a new piece of crepe paper, this time changing the grain orientation.
It was tricky to fold without introducing distortions I didn’t want yet. FoIds are firmer, but not as sharp along the edge – more a crushed look.
accordion_16
accordion_47
Sample p1-3b. Next I ran my fingernail along the folds, causing the edge to stretch and flute. Unexpectedly the sides of the fold caught together. I stretched just the hill folds and the paper formed a natural star profile. Good shadows and movement.
accordion_17
accordion_18
Sample p1-3c. I finger stretched the valley folds, trying not to disturb where the layers had caught.
accordion_19
accordion_20
Sample p1-3d. Then opened out the folds.
accordion_21
Sample p1-4a. Thinking about accordion folds while grocery shopping, I noticed a pack of drinking straws. A little cutting and messing around, and it looks like an accordion pleat – that happily moves further into 3 dimensions.
accordion_22
accordion_23
A quick sketch of method.
accordion_24
accordion_25Sample p1-5a. We’re meant to include failures. The idea was to create an accordion-like profile with pieces of straw cut in half lengthwise and joined using clear adhesive tape. Total Fail. Didn’t notice until later that in my dislike of the thing I took an equally bad photo.
accordion_26
Still thinking about the profile of the pleats, I played with some cable ties.
Sample p1-6a. First a basic accordion zigzag.
accordion_27
Sample p1-6b. Then thinking about the amount of overhang at the folds. The energy and movement changes entirely, the blue stable, motionless, the purple briskly marching us off to the right.
accordion_28
Sample p1-6c. Then exploring some of the geometrical possibilities with overlapping. l think there is lots more to find here – something to return to.
accordion_29
Sample p1-7a. Steel wool next. I unrolled the pads – messy, but I find the result exciting, so like sheep’s wool, especially that lovely crimp, and yet so different.
accordion_30
Sample p1-7b. I needed a way to keep “pleats” in the material. Thinking of the crepe paper where the sides stuck together, I used party picks to stabilize the folds. A few pictures of this, to show the closed, tight shape – but still showing pleats.
accordion_46
accordion_31
accordion_32
Sample p1-8a. I wanted something looser, more fragile (in contrast to the metallic nature), so started teasing it out -just as I would prepare wool tops for spinning.
accordion_33
accordion_34
An extra photo – because I like it.
accordion_35
Some soft accordion pleats – a cloud of metal.
accordion_36
Sample p1-8b. The form somewhat clearer with the addition of “structural” party picks.
accordion_37
Sample p1-9a. I was rather taken with the wool tops analogy, so had to make a quick length of 2-ply. Really like the look & would seem to have possibilities, but it’s a messy material, not nice to work with.
accordion_38
Going back to the damage being done to a material in the process of folding it – its bending and possibly breaking fibres. Could folding thin balsawood keep structure but produce splintering to highlight that damage?
Sample p1-10a. I used 1mm thick balsa, and tried to control the folds by lightly scoring on the underside of where I wanted to fold. Note with my crepe paper experience I was careful to fold across the grain.
accordion_39
I did get an accordion fold of a sort, with some rather nice, controlled splintering, but the material just wanted to break entirely.
accordion_40
Sample p1-11a. Next I tried without pre-scoring, but using a ruler to try to control positioning.
accordion_41
This held together, although fragile, and I began to get some of that broken vibe I was looking for.
accordion_42
accordion_43
Sample p1-12a. Finally, folding totally freehand. I very much like this.
accordion_44
The imperfect screen seems a particularly poignant effect.
accordion_45

That’s the end of linear accordion pleats, for now at least. I’ve experimented with

  • printer paper
  • crepe paper
  • plastic drinking straws
  • cable ties
  • steel wool
  • balsa wood
  • No conventional textiles – hope I’ve read the course notes correctly on that. I didn’t get through my initial list of ideas – trying to manage time, and I rather like the feeling of having an excess of ideas.

    I’m fine-tuning the working method. Those nasty interference lines are pretty much gone, but that was achieved by turning off one of my work lights meaning the photos are a little dim. I’ve read up on the camera controls in the tablet itself, so will experiment with that at some point. Hopefully what I have is good enough for now. Over the two posts I’ve included sketches on paper and quick computer-based notes, as well as lots of photos obviously, which I think was a good test of what my systems and I can do.

    labelI’ve printed off some standard labels, a format that I’ve used in the past that helps tracking samples. I can scrawl necessary details and attach in moments.

    Next step is to respond to my tutor and check that all this works for her and that I haven’t set of in totally the wrong direction.

    T1-MMT-P1-p1-e1 Linear accordion pleats continued
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 1: Surface Distortion
    Project 1: Folding and crumpling
    Exercise 1: Linear accordion pleats continued

    T1-MMT-P1-p1-e1 Linear accordion pleats

    Part 1 of the course looks at “ways of manipulating a range of materials as a means of discovering or rediscovering their creative potential” (OCA, p. 15). It’s also a chance to develop good working practices. There are five projects with a total of twenty exercises. We are asked to choose ten to attempt at this time.

    I’ve chosen to start with linear accordion pleats. It’s the first exercise of the first project and appears to be very simple. I take that to be a challenge to push myself to find more, plus an opportunity to experiment with work method.

    Here are notes from my first sample-making session:
    Sample p1-1a. Printer paper, a4. Like the mini-pleat at the end. Unfinished business. Future connection point.
    accordion_01
    Sample p1-1b. Tried to knot -difficult. Like compression and release. Moves strongly into 3 dimensions.
    accordion_02
    Sample p1-1c. Refolded into narrower pleats.
    Smoother in a sense.
    accordion_03
    Sample p1-1d. A bit easier to fold, although still stiff. Like the extra dimensionality, some flaring in the knotted area. Interesting shadow.
    accordion_04
    Sample p1-1e. Pleat of pleat. Not very interesting
    accordion_05
    Sample p1-1f. Views from front and back of sample. Fixed second pleating at fold points then expanded pleatss between. Getting complex, interesting shapes. What would happen if paper was printed (text or images?). Decided to stay on path for now. I find this sample intriguing – quite dimensional, insists on curving, lots of detail.
    accordion_07
    accordion_06
    Recording, trying to focus on lines & shapes created. Felt tip on printer paper (the same as sampled). Not accurate or interesting.
    accordion_08
    Tried adding highlights and shading. Less accurate, less interesting – and the photo flatters it.
    accordion_09
    Tried again, this time on ~A5 pastel paper, Conte crayons, thinking about tones from the start. Not accurate, but got a sense of soft & hard folds, sharp and smooth, nested.
    accordion_10

    The above is a blow-by-blow account of the session, with outcomes recorded as I went – both annotations and an attempt to focus in on a sample and discover more through drawing in different media.

    Looking for an effective way to sample and record, I had my tablet beside me, taking photos of the result after each sample manipulation. I could check the photos, crop them and delete duds straight away. Then I stored them with notations in Evernote as I went. See post 26-Feb-2015 for a bit more about the technology. When I finished the session I simply synced Evernote on my desktop machine. I saved all attachments (photos) and resized in gimp. Then a simple copy of everything into wordpress – this post.

    Pros

  • We’re asked to record and show everything, and this really is everything.
  • Given the sampling was all one piece of paper, trying one thing after another, there’s no alternative to capturing results each step of the way.
  • I used to take notes on paper as I worked, then transcribe/interpret/summarise them in blog posts. I think the new way is quicker.
  • I like having the photos kept with the notes. I used to have trouble sometimes matching things up.
  • There’s effectively a level of backup just as a byproduct of the process (not that I want to rely on that – I’ll continue my regular backups separately)
  • Doing all this doesn’t actually interrupt work. The whole idea is to be thoughtful, attentive, in our making.
  • Cons

  • There are annoying lines of light interference in the photos. I don’t want to be running around taking photos in natural light – and it’s raining today anyway. I have multiple lights on my worktable and the combination isn’t working well.
  • It could all get rather tedious for anyone looking at the blog. Sorry, low priority.
  • References

    OCA (2014) Textiles 1: Mixed Media for Textiles Barnsley: Open College of the Arts

    T1-MMT-P1-p1-e1 Linear accordion pleats
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 1: Surface Distortion
    Project 1: Folding and crumpling
    Exercise 1: Linear accordion pleats


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In Basketry NSW Transformation exhibition Sunday 2 July. More info fibresofbeing.wordpress.com

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