T1-MMT-P5 Sketchbook update 27-Feb-2016

p5-sketchpage 049; 20160214

p5-sketchpage 049; 20160214

Sketch 20150601b

Sketch 20150601b

I was very pleased to get some corrugations in my samples – corrugated cardboard has been a recurring material during this course (for example 6-Jun-2015). I started thinking about how to link in crumpled paper. Sample p5-3 (31-Jan-2016) used the technique and was an interesting result, but the green didn’t seem to fit as part of the collection. I now have some other samples that may forge a link, with the advantage of being a little less obvious.
p5-sketchpage 050; 20160216

p5-sketchpage 050; 20160216

This biro drawing was inspired by a sketch by Gillian Lowndes. Some good energy and pattern, but the vessel itself (sample p5-10) got lost.
p5-sketchpage 051; 20160217

p5-sketchpage 051; 20160217

Collage! Not a technique I am comfortable with, and this was a warmup prior to the Ruth Hadlow workshop where I expected to do lots. That didn’t happen (I sense an inner sigh of relief), but it helped me approach sample p5-8 in a different way.
p5-sketchpage 052; 20160219

p5-sketchpage 052; 20160219

Thinking about aspects of displaying the samples, I tried to trace shadows of p5-5. Not easy as I’d set it up, as I kept bumping the sample and changing the shadows. Still, it’s an example of my ongoing efforts to move forms around the page rather than defaulting to a centered full view (as suggested in my last tutor feedback).
p5-sketchpage 053; 20160219

p5-sketchpage 053; 20160219

I wanted to use acrylic paints – not a medium I’ve experimented with much. This involved combining the major colours of my collection, black and orange, and printing onto the page using various scrap materials on the worktable as stamps. There are some interesting marks, and I think the composition that developed is effective – a fair amount of movement but overall balanced. In my eyes it resembles a potential sample sitting on a tabletop.

p5-sketchpage 054; 20160222

p5-sketchpage 054; 20160222

This grouping of samples p5-5, p5-10 and p3-35 was created using a variant of the sketching brief developed in Ruth Hadlow’s workshop (25-Feb-2016). It used charcoal and orange conte crayon. I varied the time constraint, allowing as much time as I wanted on the final layer. There’s a lot of energy. I think the under-sketching is very effective in adding movement, interest and complexity. The haze of earlier orange helps to bring the sketch together. Taking extra time on the final layer allowed me to produce a more finished, coherent result. I tried to anchor the items more, with shadows and a suggestion of edges on a round table, which I see as improvements.
p5-sketchpage 055; 20160223

p5-sketchpage 055; 20160223

Although excited by the new drawing approach I thought it was important to keep moving between approaches, so attempted this observational sketch in coloured pencil of samples p5-11, p5-12 and p5-13. Dull.

p5-sketchpage 056; 20160223

p5-sketchpage 056; 20160223

Unsatisfied by the previous sketch I did another of the same subjects using charcoal and the three layer approach. I think this version is more successful at showing the links between the objects, suggesting the lines of corrugation and the tensed distortion of organza and 3D plastic drawing.

I’d like to explore more with the 3D pen. I’ve noted the wire which animates Gillian Lowndes’ work. Perhaps 3D drawing could serve a similar function while also continuing my existing lines of enquiry during the course.

p5-sketchpage 057; 20160224

p5-sketchpage 057; 20160224

Samples p5-10 and p3-35 were the subject of this blind, continuous line drawing, done with a three minute time limit. I was surprised by the result, I expected much more – then realised the biro had run out during the time. An unanticipated drawback of blind drawing!
p5-sketchpage 058; 20160224

p5-sketchpage 058; 20160224

Another version of the previous page – with a new biro. The nature of the lines is different – not so much from examining the visual result of the first attempt, but more that some of the movements hadn’t felt right, had got me into trouble as if I knew my hand wasn’t doing the right thing even as I was working. A strange feedback. Could one exploit this, deliberately doing something that “feels” wrong, that isn’t a match for the object you’re drawing? Big bold lines to describe a delicate tracery. What would be the point?
p5-sketchpage 059; 20160225

p5-sketchpage 059; 20160225

Another sketch of another piece by Gillian Lowndes. I was using a charcoal pencil, giving a much sharper line. I think this catches the different materials – the spiky wire wrapping, the hard lines of a pot shard, the softer droop of the bag formed from fibreglass dipped in slip. I like the quality of line the pencil gave, strong and bold but not solid.
p5-sketchpage 060; 20160226

p5-sketchpage 060; 20160226

Drawn after visiting El Anatsui: Five decades at the Carriageworks. At the top is a response to Awakened, done in various colours of pen on the inside of an envelope (trying to vary my surfaces beyond the default white cartridge). I don’t find this result interesting, and I found it slightly painful to produce – those tight repetitive movements. Below is a piece of heavy drawing paper, on which I drew in 4H pencil then charcoal. I was trying to reproduce an effect seen in a sketch by El Anatsui, but this wasn’t the right method.

T1-MMT-P5 Sketchbook update 27-Feb-2016
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Sketchbook update 27-Feb-2016

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Fabulous figure sculpting workshop with Kassandra Bossell!

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