T1-MMT-P5-s3 Final vessel samples

p5-sketchpage 047; 20160211

p5-sketchpage 047; 20160211
Click image for larger view

The final samples are based on ideas recorded on sketchbook page 47, 11-Feb-2016 and previously shown 15-Feb-2016.

They were based in a few ideas – returning to the corrugated surface I found effective in earlier samples in the course; returning more closely to the casting of the internal space of vessels as in Assignment 3 (I’ve felt at risk of venturing too far from the basic course parameters); and bringing together my main materials – resin, plaster and the orange organza.

Sample p5-11

Sample p5-11

Sample p5-11

Sample p5-11 Setup

Sample p5-11 Setup
Click image for larger view

This vessel could easily slot into Assignment 3. Some corrugated plastic shelf liner was used the create the external shape, which was deformed by tying and pressing in lumps of plaster left from previous sampling. To form a “vessel” rather than the more generic “object” a cardboard tube was wrapped in more corrugated plastic and held in the poured plaster as it was setting.

The shape gently undulates, emphasised by the ridges of the corrugation which respond to lighting with gentle shadows. The colour and form are calm, solid.

Sample p5-11 view 2

Sample p5-11 view 2
Click image for larger view

The shape is quite compact, standing around 10 cm high. I find its proportions satisfying and it attracts the eye and the touch. I regard this as a very successful sample. It is also useful in the collection, being less aggressively showy than some other vessels but with a lot of its own quiet character. Its movement is within clear boundaries, providing a solidity and stability.
blank_line
Sample p5-12

Sample p5-12 - two views

Sample p5-12 – two views

Sample p5-12 Setup

Sample p5-12 Setup
Click image for larger view

Sample p5-12 had a similar genesis. A tube held corrugated plaster in a firm column. What was intended to be an internal space was made with a cardboard tube covered in plastic. While setting the mold was supported at an angle, impacting on the shape of the cast vessel. Limited visibility and buoyancy of the inserted tube resulted in the internal void touching a side of the vessel.
Sample p5-12 In progress

Sample p5-12 In progress
Click image for larger view

I was very tempted to stop with the sample in this form. It created an interesting contrast to p5-11 and I found it visually appealing. The idea of potentially ruining it was unattractive.

However this course is all about risk and I continued.

The vessel was returned to the mold, but this time held upright rather than at an angle. A large piece of orange crystal organza was heat distorted. It was then soaked in liquid resin and pressed onto the plaster in the mold.

There are some technical issues in the outcome. I didn’t push the plaster vessel firmly into the mold and a rather odd foot of resin formed. It’s only attached along a small part of the edge, and it’s not clear how stable and long-lasting it will be. The bottom of the cardboard roll and inner plastic set firmly in the resin. I was able to cut away most, but the bottom of the void is unsightly. I would prefer more dribbles of resin down the sides of the plaster. I find the uneven patterning unattractive. On its own the form is much more static than the other pieces in the collection.

Its strength lies in combination.

Samples p5-4 p5-11 and p5-12

Samples p5-4 p5-11 and p5-12

I find this first grouping very exciting. These three samples, with all their individual idiosyncrasies, clearly belong together. They respond to each other. I’m beginning to get some very interesting results in the interactions of the collection.
blank_line
Sample p5-13
Sample p5-13

Sample p5-13

Sample p5-13 Side view

Sample p5-13 Side view
Click image for larger view

There was some resin left over after making sample p5-12.

Sample p1-59b After - on mould

Sample p1-59b After – on mould
Click image for larger view

Sample p1-59 (20-Apr-2015) was quickly jammed into a plastic bowl, a piece of (undistorted) orange organza was thrown in, and the setting resin poured and scrapped on.

So much planning and effort went into p5-12, virtually none into p5-13, but in the context of the collection the result is wonderful. I’m really looking forward to mixing it in with the group. It’s lively, unexpected, fascinating, exciting, energetic.
blank_line
There’s been a lot going on lately and I’m feeling behind in posting, losing the chronology, with topics influencing each other. As a reminder to self:
* Ruth Hadlow workshop
* Gillian Lowndes research
* Grayson Perry exhibition
* Recent sketching
* Sorting

To whet your (and my) appetite, some quick shots of my work area. You will no doubt appreciate, as I do, the extensive tidying up that happened yesterday.

T1-MMT-P5-s3 Final vessel samples
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 5: A final piece
Stage 3: Sample-making
Final vessel samples

4 Responses to “T1-MMT-P5-s3 Final vessel samples”


  1. 1 JulieB February 23, 2016 at 9:42 pm

    This is very exciting, Judy. I especially like p5-11, what lovely lines. Also working well as a grouping; just enough common elements to link them, but each piece has its own identity too.


  1. 1 T1-MMT-P5-s7 Reflection – Mixed Media for Textiles | Fibres of Being Trackback on March 28, 2016 at 5:02 pm
  2. 2 Weekly roundup 24 July 2016 | Fibres of Being Trackback on July 24, 2016 at 9:37 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Instagram

#voteyes

Calendar of Posts

February 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jan   Mar »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29  

Archives

Categories


%d bloggers like this: