T1-MMT-P2 Joining and Wrapping – Sorting

Which samples have interesting attractive elements, which have potential for development?

Sample p2-2h  To destruction

Sample p2-2h To destruction

In sample p2-2 (6-June-2015) I experimented with multiple presentations of corrugated cardboard connected with cocktail sticks. The cardboard has warmth, has both flexibility and strength depending on how you use it, can be broken in a variety of ways leaving a range of edges, and is cheaply available with lots of variations. Light plays along its surfaces. Using an intrinsic property of the material in forming joins is very satisfying. There is potential from associations – a cheap covering on a cold night on the streets, a flimsy armour of appearance not substance, an empty box remaining… I would like to use this material more.

Sample p2-12 j

Sample p2-12 j

In a later exercise I was able to take the material and basic technique a little further (14-June-2015). This is a more refined and decorative version, but clearly the potential just expands together with the gap of the join. Another variant in this iteration included decorative beads and twists.

Sample p2-3 a

Sample p2-3 a

I include sample p2-3 (6-June-2015) in my selection as an example of risk taken. It began by taking one of my favourite samples from Part 1, then cutting and puncturing it. The risk paid off, with a new, bright and attractive set of samples and a way forward to develop the original surface distortion possibilities. In the event my extended joining sample took a slightly different path, but joining multiple, relatively small components in ways found during this exploration could build to an interesting whole.

Sample p2-7c Detail

Sample p2-7c Detail

Multiple threads were used in groups in sample p2-7 (11-June-2015). In a sense this was an exploration of gravity – how does this fall? – and if I had time I know such ideas can be linked back to the early days of fibre sculpture (see 26-December-2014) and elsewhere. I would love to work further with this – different weights and lengths and materials and scale of thread and cord, using gravity but also joining … what?

Sample p2-18

Sample p2-18

This sample (19-June-2015) used p2-13 as a base. The insect mesh is another of my preferred non-conventional materials and in this sample it provides both layering and movement. A curved edge was joined to a hole creating a lot of volume, and the orange cable ties provide additional drama and focus in the spot of colour, although contained and to an extent controlled by the mesh. However it is in the combination of the two samples which really lifts the result. The colours are limited but crisp, strong and distinct. There is variation in line and texture. Light and shadow comes into play, providing additional drama, variation in tone and general interest. There is a grace to the curve of the mesh which is lovely. I slightly altered this sample and used it as a decorative element on my extended join sample ensemble, and it worked very well as a body adornment.

Sample p2-19

Sample p2-19

Sample p2-19 (19-June-2015) is an attractive combination of colour and texture. Satisfying in itself, it would be interesting to extend the sample into three dimensions, possibly repeating variants of the inset motif. I would not want to lose the spacing around the inset element, or the contrast of organic and geometric lines. This sample is another instance of joining corrugated cardboard using its own ridges, an idea that continues to attract me.

Sample p2-21

Sample p2-21

Another attractive combination is sample p2-21 (22-June-2015). Two very different materials are joined in a way which links them visually as well as functionally. The circle motif is seen embossed in the paper, in the heat treatment of the metal, and in the embossing and holes of the join. The red of the paper is seen through the piercing, and also in part of the metal’s colour variation. Contrasting textures add interest and bring light to the combination. I like the general approach of integration of materials across a join, and this particular instance would work very well as the cover of a hand-bound book.

Sample p2-23 After heat treatment

Sample p2-23 After heat treatment

Sample p2-23 (22-June-2015) is included for its potential. The join and later heat treatment takes advantage of the different properties of the two materials. I think this is a very powerful idea, suggesting possibilities to modify one material with traits acquired from a second. Another version is seen in the shaping created with netting and plastic in sample p2-3 above.

Sample p2-26 Extended - various views

Sample p2-26 Extended – various views

Sample p2-26 (27-June-2015) provides a means to join and extend segments with great flexibility. The join can be flat, but is even more interesting if angles are included or joins made away from the edge. This sample uses fairly rigid paper – a new set of effects are possible with a soft material used on one or both sides of the join.

A number of selected samples allow separate elements to be joined and developed into a larger work. This could be useful in the context of distance learning, if I wanted to work at a larger scale but post only part for review by tutor and assessors.

Front

Front

The extended join sample (2-July-2015) has been included as another example of the strength of combining multiple ideas in building up a work. Of course it includes p2-18, which itself is a combination of samples.

Keeping to a restricted colour scheme allowed all the components to work together to create a cohesive, balanced ensemble. Examining the whole there are many moments of interest, but no single part dominates.

Sample p2-42 detail

Sample p2-42 detail

Sample p2-42 is fun and dynamic. I would like to create a series of works in different scales, with different wrapped objects. As a start I would keep with simple colours, perhaps all objects bleached wood, and simple but varying shapes and scales. They could be grouped hung at different heights in a gallery. Lorna Murray’s Making Space (22-May-2015) comes to mind, with simplified carved shapes in a theme forming a group.

Sample p2-58 b

Sample p2-58 b

During the wrapping exercises I became conscious of absence – the space left by something, or the gap in our attention / visual perception when we take items for granted. Sample p2-58 (16-July-2015) is moderately interesting as a wrapping around a spoon. It is much more interesting when the spoon has been removed. In either or both forms the sample could be built up in a series, possibly combined with sample p2-42. If hung empty the sample would stretch, which could be useful, or it could be stabilised with additional strands of plastic. It could be interesting to have quite different “barnacles” in other colours attached.

Sample p2-57 detail

Sample p2-57 detail

Initially I didn’t include sample p2-57 (16-July-2015). A braid in conventional yarns seemed just too conventional, even if around a wooden spoon. Was it too safe? Regardless, it is interesting and attractive. The colours glow, there is just a hint of sparkle to bring in light. The four part braid adjusts smoothly to the changing width of the spoon, the technique a critical part of the success of the work as can be seen by comparison to sample p2-56. The plump, soft lines contrast to the hard, smooth wood visible within.

For me there is also a welcome reminder of my textile core. I’m trying to be open and adventurous, taking advantage of the stimulus of this course and enjoying the ride, but my roots remain in textiles.

experimental collagraph 01

experimental collagraph 01

Done within the period of the course, I’ve included this collagraph print done in a workshop with Jet James (16-July-2015). The techniques learned may be useful later in the course, but more directly samples already made were used to emboss the printing plate. To the left are leaves joined with machine stitching – p2-10. Almost any flatish sample can be used to create textures in a print. Of course that print could then be combined or used in further development. I wonder how p2-58 would behave going through the press. Prints and more wrappings could be used in a display together, or the print could be torn or altered using one of the other sampled processes.

Sample p2-65

Sample p2-65

I’ve mentioned in a previous post that I regard sample p2-65 (22-July-2015) as the most fully resolved work created in this Part of the course.

I don’t have anything to add. I wouldn’t change it (if it still existed!), I wouldn’t want to create a larger grouping. I would mount it in a very minimal way, perhaps on a square white primed canvas, and hang it as is.

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Samples p2-68, p2-69 and p2-70 (22-July-2015) excite me. Each on its own has its merits, especially p2-70. For no clear reason I would like a kitchen dresser full of empty plastic shells, or perhaps carefully wrapped items one after another. A Miss Havisham moment? I’m not sure, but there could be a poignancy and fragility about such a collection.

Perhaps it would be better to be less obvious. I’m thinking of cutting or combining, or perhaps hanging on a Christmas tree. With that mix it seems to be a solution looking for a problem, but there must be places to take this. It wants to tell a narrative.

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On similar lines there is sample p2-72 (22-July-2015). I like the idea of a shattered exhibition, each piece carefully wrapped and then destroyed, with shards and simplified volume left to tell – what?

I don’t want to force the last couple of ideas. Suitable opportunities will present at some time. I remain very interested in the fragile, and absence of what was.

Sample p2-74 Detail - multiple wrappings and joins

Sample p2-74 Detail – multiple wrappings and joins

Sample p2-74 (28-July-2015) is difficult to describe. It’s a quirky mix that has a kind of swagger and independent air about it. It can grab attention, puzzle, and may not delight. For me it is a step well out of the comfort zone and I am surprised at how much I like it.

Sample p2-78

Sample p2-78

As a weaver I enjoyed creating sample p2-78 (28-July-2015). It uses conventional yarns in a non-conventional wrapping. A dynamic abstract artwork has resulted. Working on it was fast and free. The greatest potential I see for it is in experimenting with colour choices, but a collection of them could surprise and delight.

Looking back at the work of the last ten weeks I think I have created a strong set of samples. There are certainly dull ones and one or two total failures, but they are in the minority. Quite a few more could have been included in this sorting. In practice I have created A3 pages with small photographs of each sample in the two Parts completed – a bit like photo proof sheets. Pinned to a nearby board I refer to them often, looking for samples or techniques that I can bring forward into new work. Quite a lot from Part 1 was Joined in Part 2, and samples within Part 2 were combined or taken apart and reused as work progressed. It could get tricky to submit physical work for assessment, but I really like the continuity and complexity which is building.

T1-MMT-P2 Joining and Wrapping – Sorting
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 2: Joining and wrapping
Sorting

2 Responses to “T1-MMT-P2 Joining and Wrapping – Sorting”


  1. 1 JulieB August 3, 2015 at 5:46 am

    Such vibrant and varied work. I love p2-21, p2-74 and your experimental collograph. And p2-58b seems really poignant in the way it suggests absence and loss – for me it evokes my grandmother and her cooking.


  1. 1 T1-MMT-P2 Joining and Wrapping – Review | Fibres of Being Trackback on August 6, 2015 at 5:01 pm

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