T1-MMT-P2-p1-e4 Overlapping edges

Sample p2-3 d

Sample p2-3 d

The course notes for this exercise suggest starting by placing “one edge over the other to create an overlap of about 1 cm”. I may be overthinking, but it seems that a lot of overlapping joins, either straight or curved, could look just like a flush join.

For example sample p2-3 d (6-June-2015). That upper piece could actually sit behind the lower piece with a 1 cm overlap. For some applications it would be a good idea – no risk of gapeing or draughts. There is little bulkiness. The difference would be structural rather than visual. Useful but trivial in the absence of a particular purpose.

So I’m looking for joins which take advantage of the overlap.

Sample p2-20
One way is to see the lower material through the overlap. Here I have the offcut of cork from sample p2-15 (18-June-2015), overlapped by insect screening.

Sample p2-20 Materials

Sample p2-20 Materials

Wanting a joining method that was visible but not intrusive, I auditioned a number of threads for stitching.

Sample p2-20 Stitched

Sample p2-20 Stitched

It was easier to stitch first, then trim the shape. I was very mindful of previous experience and placed stitches by eye 🙂

Sample p2-20

Sample p2-20

In the finished sample the join method highlights the curves of the join without overwhelming the overall composition. The glitter of the chosen thread matches the screening well. The stitching becomes a subordinate feature.

Sample p2-20 c

Sample p2-20 c

Sample p2-20 b

Sample p2-20 b

Sample p2-20 d

Sample p2-20 d

After completing the sample I experimented with different placements of the trimmed screening material. Some interesting positive and negative shapes are generated as the is moved and rotated.

If I were to develop the sample in this way an invisible join of some type might work. Perhaps a glue could be used, although this could leave a gloss or film.

Sample p2-20 Reverse

Sample p2-20 Reverse

The reverse of the sample suggests possibilities in using varying depths of materials.

Sample p2-21
Seeing the lower material through the overlap worked well, but of course I don’t want to be restricted to see-through materials. Piercing the upper material at the overlap greatly broadens material choices.

Wanting clean holes and given I only have circular punches, I selected a paper embossed with circles and some metal with traces of a mesh used when heating it.

Sample p2-21 Materials

Sample p2-21 Materials

Punching holes through metal was tricky. There were a few mishaps, which led to the idea of using embossing as well as actual holes on the metal.

The mechanical join was intended to be invisible so I chose to glue. I consulted with fellow student Claire, and used Aleene’s super thick tacky.

Sample p2-21

Sample p2-21


The end result is very pleasing. The materials compliment each other in colour and motif. The transition from one material to the other brings additional complexity and interest, achieving an integrated whole.

The actual join structure is effective, providing a strong bond without impinging on the visual result. The photograph was taken at an angle to reduce reflections and gives a reasonable impression, but seen in person there is a varying shine in the metal and the soft sheen of the paper which is particularly attractive.

Sample p2-22
This sample stretches the idea of overlap to include partial integration of one material into another.

The materials used are a craft paper which is actually woven of something like rafia, lightly glued to a non-woven synthetic base, together with some orange foam.

Sample p2-22 Materials

Sample p2-22 Materials

Sample p2-22 Cutting plan

Sample p2-22 Cutting plan

I spent a long time analysing the weave structure with pencil and on the computer, trying to figure exact measurements and placement to continue the design into the foam. Neatness and precision seemed paramount to create the effect envisaged. I really made hard work of it – there were false starts and at one point I felt close to total failure. Eventually I improved my handling techniques, and the inaccuracies are not too intrusive.

Sample p2-22

Sample p2-22

The two sides of the join are well integrated, with the overlapping area providing a visual transition between very different materials. Colour choice was key in this sample, with the orange providing continuity across the join.

Sample p2-22 Reverse before and after taping

Sample p2-22 Reverse before and after taping

On the reverse side the raw ends are entirely encased in a strong adhesive cloth tape. This is neat, stable, and effective in containing loose ends.

Sample p2-23
Multiple independent joins are another method which highlights an overlap in a join. I was also interested in trying to take advantage of the properties of one material to influence the second material through the join.

In sample p1-75 (21-April-2015) synthetic organza distorted and shrank under the heat-gun. What would be the impact if it was first joined to another material? I needed a pliable second material that would not put undue strain or restraint on the organza, and chose to experiment with crepe paper.

Sample p2-23 Before heat treatment

Sample p2-23 Before heat treatment

The join was made with a series of metal brads in a roughly diamond pattern (the plan can be seen in the sketch photographed for sample p2-22 above). The organza was around 30cm wide and 23 cm long. The paper was also 30 cm wide, but longer at 28 cm. The overlap was 5 cm, giving total dimensions of 30 cm x 46 cm. I hoped that when heat was applied the organza would shrink, causing the paper to distort at the join, and softly falling in gentle curves below. On the other hand, there could be burning, tearing, discolouration of paper or brads …

Sample p2-23 After heat treatment

Sample p2-23 After heat treatment

After heating the organza is around 18 cm wide by 12cm long. The paper was unchanged, but gathered at the join. There is a little tearing around some of the brads. Faster action on my part would avoid that if done again. There is some nice texture and variation of colour in the organza. The pattern of the set of the joining brads works quite well, the inaccuracies less apparent in the reduced size.

Sample p2-23 Reverse after heat treatment

Sample p2-23 Reverse after heat treatment


Sample p2-23 Backlit

Sample p2-23 Backlit

The sample looks like a baby doll’s dress. Potentially it could be used directly like that in a work. It reminds me of Jin Nü’s work seen in the 18th Biennale of Sydney, Exuviate II: Where Have All the Children Gone? (http://www.whiterabbitcollection.org/artists/jin-nu-%E9%87%91-%E9%87%B9/), although she used actual dresses in that.

Sample p2-24
For the final sample in this exercise I deliberately chose materials I thought wouldn’t work together. My earlier samples were all pleasant, some in my eyes beautiful, and I want to be a risk-taker. I also went larger again in scale.

Sample p2-24 Materials

Sample p2-24 Materials


The materials chosen are a coarse hessian from a garden supply store (very rustic and natural) and a foil shelf liner (highly polished). When I got them out I was surprised to see an affinity in the grid of the two materials.

Sample p2-24 Plan

Sample p2-24 Plan


The foil used was around 60cm wide. The join technique is in thought process an extension of the circles of sample p2-21, but actually pushing the lower material through to make the join. A small section of the hessian pushed through would be held in place by a knot (larger than the hole), or additional material caught inside the “puff” of hessian.

Sample p2-24

Sample p2-24

It didn’t go according to plan. I couldn’t get enough hessian through the hole to form a knot. The foil liner began to tear around the holes and wouldn’t stand up to the manipulation needed to insert additional material. The foil was pinned to the display board and kept tearing with the weight of the hessian.

The materials were too different to make the combination aesthetically appealing. Possibly roughly painting the hessian with a white or grey, or adding some trails of glitter or some foil applique would act as support to the existing small link of the grids. Both sides are too self-contained for the join to make sense.

The sample did last long enough to be the subject of a sketch in charcoal on kraft paper to wind up the exercise.
Sketch_20150621

T1-MMT-P2-p1-e4 Overlapping edges
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 2: Joining and wrapping
Project 1: Joining
Exercise 4: Overlapping edges

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Instagram

Germination II
In Basketry NSW Transformation exhibition Sunday 2 July. More info fibresofbeing.wordpress.com

Calendar of Posts

June 2015
M T W T F S S
« May   Jul »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Archives

Categories


%d bloggers like this: