T1-MMT-P2-p1-e3 Joining curved edges – post 2

Sample p2-17
This sample aimed at joining curved edges that both touch and leave gaps.
I cut two rectangular pieces of fibreglass insect screening, then cut one edge of each into curves.

Sample p2-17 First curves

Sample p2-17 First curves

The first cuts didn’t give multiple touch points, so I did some trimming.

Sample p2-17 Adjusted curves

Sample p2-17 Adjusted curves

A few touches and one overlap.

Sample p2-17a. Where there was a touch, I made a join using orange cable ties.

Sample p2-17 a

Sample p2-17 a

Sample p2-17b. Where there was a gap or an overlap, I forced a join with blue cable ties.

Sample p2-17 b

Sample p2-17 b

It doesn’t look hugely different from a top view, but the tensions caused by closing gaps are beginning to distort the screening.

Sample p2-17 b Side view

Sample p2-17 b Side view

Samples p2-17c (purple) and p2-7d (yellow) continued the joining process.

Sample p2-17 c

Sample p2-17 c

Sample p2-17 c

Sample p2-17 c

The mesh of the insect screening looks crisp and clean and as it is distorted moiré patterns highlight the movements. The cable ties create dynamic lines across the field and bring focus to the critical area of the join.

In this sample there was very little overlapping of screening. Multiple depths of shadow could be achieved by layering of the material – an area of potential for later exploration.

Sample p2-18
Materials from earlier samples were used to explore joining to the edge of a hole. Sample p2-13 (18-June-2015) provided the base, and an offcut from sample p2-17 the joined material.

Sample p2-18 Materials

Sample p2-18 Materials

The two materials were joined using cable ties, using holes punched into the base and pushing through the mesh of the insect screening.

Sample p2-18

Sample p2-18


Curve joined to curve creates a tulip of mesh, cupped around a jumble of cable-tie stamen. Mesh undulates across the work, echoed and framed by the white curves of paper fanning behind. Light is layered passing through the materials, shadows can be soft, gridded or overlapping.

In her report on assignment 1 my tutor suggested “continue developing your writing style and look for new ways to talk about your work”. The previous paragraph was an attempt at that. Not too bad, but what I really want to say is that I love, love, love this sample. There is a balance of materials, dynamic colours and forms, a sense of space and such variety of shadow.

Sample p2-19
The final sample for this exercise is a hole filled with another material on the same plane. For this I used indigo dyed paper seen in the tearing exercises (26-April-2015), and indeed I was careful and thoughtful when tearing a hole, wanting to create a framing boundary of white.

The filling material is cardboard cut from sample p2-12 (14-June-2015), and copper wire from the sample sample used to create the join. In this case the wire could again go through the channels in the cardboard, while simple stitches were taken in the paper.

Sample p2-19

Sample p2-19

Crisp lines in cardboard and metal are contained by, integrated in, the organic patterning of the dyed paper. The complementary blue and orange, separated by a small space, enhance each other. All elements of the join – base, filler and join materials – work to create an harmonious whole.

There are similarities in method, although not mood or meaning, to Edward Ruscha’s work Gospel, seen at the Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW collection).

Most of my samples are exploratory fragments developing ideas and techniques with future potential. I think this sample can stand on its own as is.

This work session was fairly quick and uninterrupted, unlike some recent “sessions” which were pockets of time gathered over multiple days. I enjoyed the materials, processes and the results. Balancing this, in my final sketch I just could not see the sample in front of me, despite multiple restarts.
Sketch_20150619

T1-MMT-P2-p1-e3 Joining curved edges – post 2
Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
Part 2: Joining and wrapping
Project 1: Joining
Exercise 3: Joining curved edges

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