T1-MMT-P1-p4-e2 Scratching – first session

I was attracted to this exercise as another way of distressing the surface (like folding etc).
Some initial thoughts:

  • Does it have to be a solid surface?
  • Scratching in plasticine or wet paint.
  • Scratching on a surface and then printing from it.
  • Choosing fragile materials or materials with a fragile face to scratch.
  • Layers of colour (crayon? Felt?)
  • I started by collecting an initial pool of things to scratch with.

    Some potential tools

    Some potential tools

    I decided to start on some indigo dyed paper, as the surface marks easily and scratches should be visible. After the first attempt (Sample p1-136, A1) I decided to work on multiple pages at the same time. Looking back I’m not sure why – efficiency in producing samples probably. See my comments at the end on this choice and the consequences.

    I worked on four A4 pages at the same time.
    Sample p1-136. Indigo dyed cartridge paper
    sample p1-137. Handmade paper (from Makerspace)
    Sample p1-138. 118 gsm strathmore toned gray sketch paper
    Sample p1-139. 80 gsm copy paper

    The tools selected:

    Chosen tools

    Chosen tools


    Top row, left to right: T pin, flat blade screwdriver, fork, boot knife, serrated knife, hair comb, wooden skewer, hex screwdriver, screw bottle top.
    Bottom row, left to right: Fine toothed wool carder, paint brush, large compass.

    Experiments and comments:
    A1: T pin, held at angle to paper, dragged up to the right.

    A1

    A1


    P1-136 An irregular mark, with bits of the surface lifted.
    P1-137 Tore through paper.
    P1-138 Fine irregular lines, change in visibility at different angles.
    P1-139 more lifting of paper, giving better shadow lines.

    B1: T pin, held perpendicular to paper, dragged down without great pressure.

    B1

    B1


    P1-136 line appears more dotted / beaded.
    P1-137 learnt to be very gentle to avoid ripping. Tufty look in lifting fibres.
    P1-138 initial scratches hardly visible, so used more force. A more fine, precise look.
    P1-139 little to see. If increased pressure to create more of a mark, wanted to catch and tear.

    C1: T pin drawn in a spiral.

    C1

    C1


    P1-136 hard to manage. Jumps in line.
    P1-137 Similar difficulty with jumping.
    P1-138 was able to get closer to a continuous line, but hardly visible.
    P1-139 I like the variety in the line, with different levels of catching.

    D1: flat screwdriver, held like a pencil, dragged up to the left with corner scratching paper

    D1

    D1


    P1-136 generally bolder, more consistent lines, although a few didn’t catch into the surface.
    P1-137 couldn’t find a pressure balance to make mark but avoid tearing.
    P1-138 fine lines, few catches.
    P1-139 hard to see (except for slight rust from the screwdriver!) A slight dent, no catching.

    A2: Flat blade screwdriver, held in fist perpendicular to paper, short curved scratches.

    A2

    A2


    P1-136 Marks more gentle, look a bit like fishscales.
    P1-137 Some broader fluff marks on some of the upswings, but subdued.
    P1-138 Marks a bit more visible, as scrapes across the surface.
    P1-139 Also more subtle, more broad scrapes across rather than scratching into the surface.

    B2: Fork (from picnic set – steel, but light). Held with 4 tines touching paper, drawn up to the right.

    B2

    B2


    P1-136 Hard to get marks initially. Held fork more perpendicular and used more pressure.
    P1-137 Tines make wider lines and more consistent lines than earlier. Makes me think of furrowed fields.
    P1-138 Used quite a bit of force to get marks. A bend to the marks that look like grasses in the breeze.
    P1-139 Marks inconsistent. Areas of general abrasion.

    C2: Fork as above. Held with 4 tines on paper, guiding finger pressing them down, pulled down page in undulating lines.

    C2

    C2


    P1-136 Inconsistency in lines. Generally fine to very fine.
    P1-137 Got one tear and had to lift up. With care and luck this could create a nice texture.
    P1-138 Clear lines, indenting but not abrading the surface.
    P1-139 Similar to above. Hard to see.

    D2: Boot knife, dragged smoothly down to right, front corner pressed down.

    D2

    D2


    P1-136 too much pressure – straight cuts through paper.
    P1-137 tried to adjust pressure, with mixed results. Tears rather than cuts.
    P1-138 sharp lines.
    P1-139 very nearly cut through.

    A3: Boot knife, quick short movements down to the right.

    A3

    A3


    P1-136 managed not to cut through. Visibility varies depending on angle of light and view, but a little like stylized drawing of rain.
    P1-137 Hard to see. Noticed while turning it to view that the lines encourage folding in the paper – could be useful if doing shaping.
    P1-138 At detail view there is some variation in shape and depth where the knife corner first hits the paper.
    P1-139 Not much to see. Almost cut through paper.

    B3: Serrated knife (from picnic set – light steel), dragged down to right trying to keep length of serration on paper.

    B3

    B3


    P1-136 Straight, sharp lines, a little wider and abraded at top.
    P1-137 Mostly managed not to catch. Lines fairly continuous, with lifting at both sides almost in occasional Vs.
    P1-138 Fine lines.
    P1-139 Fine lines. Almost cut through.

    C3: Serrated knife as above. Serration held flat to paper and dragged to right (each serration making a separate mark).

    C3

    C3


    P1-136 Mix of parallel lines. Almost looks like a paintbrush effect.
    P1-137 Once I learnt to be gentle got large area of abrasion with some finer horizontal indenting visible.
    P1-138 Went over and over trying to get something to see. Lots of fine lines, some abrasion.
    P1-139 Similar to p1-138. Very understated.

    A4: Plastic hair comb, drawn up to the right.

    A4

    A4


    P1-136 A few faint lines.
    P1-137 Indentations without abrasion – first tool to produce this on this paper.
    P1-138 Next to nothing.
    P1-139 Even less.

    B4: Wooden skewer drawn down in undulating line, then when not much seen on indigo, dragged up to the right.

    B4

    B4


    P1-136 Almost invisible. Went back and tried again after relative success on other surfaces. Still not good – this paper looks best where the surface is broken and contrasting colours seen. Simple pressure lines get lost in the overall patterning of colour.
    P1-137 Both movements worked well, clear marks without abrading surface.
    P1-138 Can see a bit if the light hits at the right angle.
    P1-139 Not much.

    C4: A hex screwdriver, held down and twisted.

    C4

    C4


    P1-136 At an angle see slight scraping of surface.
    P1-137 There is some shine in circles where pressure from screwdriver “polished” surface, but most obvious marks are colour rubbed off.
    P1-138 Again get a circular polished effect, seen more in raking light.
    P1-139 Some polishing and some partial indentation. Very understated.

    D4: A screw bottle cap, some small “tags” where the seal was broken. Held down and twisted.

    D4

    D4


    P1-136 Some catching and tearing of surface. Circular pattern is not apparent.
    P1-137 Good circle indentations with some abrasion. One small tear.
    P1-138 Circles visible, but not smooth.
    P1-139 Jagged circles.

    A5: Fine toothed wool carder. Drawn down.

    A5

    A5


    P1-136 Didn’t break surface, fine lines visible as polishing in some lights, and rough to the touch.
    P1-137 Inconsistent areas of abrasion. No lines visible.
    P1-138 Rough to touch. Some polished lines in raking light.
    P1-139 Little to see.

    B5: Wrong end of a cheap plastic-handled brush. Drawn up to the right.

    B5

    B5


    P1-136 Some faint broad scrapes.
    P1-137 Ditto.
    P1-138 In raking light can just about see dotted lines of inconsistent polishing.
    P1-139 Very little to see.

    D5: Tool for drawing large circles, using pencil as pivot point and normal pivot to scrape paper.

    D5

    D5


    P1-136 Tricky to control tool. Inconsistent lines.
    P1-137 Inconsistent.
    P1-138 Polished, indented arcs.
    P1-139 Indented arcs.

    Overall the softer papers showed more variety and visibility of marks. The smooth papers gave little if any interest. The indigo is best where the surface is lifted and there is contrast of colour. The handmade paper gives more of a textured result, with impact variable depending on angle of lighting.
    All the photographs above are different scales with lighting at different angles, trying to show each result as well as I could. They actually flatter the overall pages.

    sample p1-136

    Sample p1-136 Indigo dyed cartridge paper


    Experiment references are included in the photograph above. The other samples all follow the same general placement.
    Sample p1-137

    Sample p1-137 Handmade paper (from Makerspace)


    Sample p1-138

    Sample p1-138 118 gsm strathmore toned gray sketch paper


    Sample p1-139

    Sample p1-139 80 gsm copy paper

    Overall I’m disappointed with the results, which I think come from a flawed process. I started with tools, not materials. Then I turned it into a kind of production line, one tool at a time and four different materials. I didn’t respond to a result and follow it up with a new idea. By not focusing on a single material I don’t feel I explored or took advantage of its particular properties.

    The indigo and handmade papers gave the greatest interest. Thicker and/or layered surfaces seem to offer more when scratching, allowing a contrast of colour or texture without actually causing a cut or hole. I don’t feel inspired to take any of the particular samples above further.

    T1-MMT-P1-p4-e2 Scratching
    Textiles 1 – Mixed Media for Textiles
    Part 1: Surface Distortion
    Project 4: Scratching and embossing
    Exercise 2: Scratching

    Leave a Reply

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s




    Instagram

    Goodyer girls long weekend in Hobart

    Calendar of Posts

    May 2015
    M T W T F S S
    « Apr   Jun »
     123
    45678910
    11121314151617
    18192021222324
    25262728293031

    Archives

    Categories


    %d bloggers like this: