Project 10 Stage 4 – part 2

After making the figure (blogged 9-Feb-2013) the second major phase of construction was the binding tape.

p5_text_choicesIt turned into a multi-stage process to decide just what I wanted and how to achieve my design. Since this course is so much about process I want to show the various steps and decision points. I’ve been trying to observe myself work, and one standard sequence is that I ask myself a question or come up against a problem, it rumbles around in my mind – conscious and unconscious – I have various conversations with myself, and generally an answer, or part of one, or a new question, comes up in minutes, hours or days. This time multiple iterations of that pattern were needed. It’s not inspiration, it doesn’t come from nowhere – but it’s hard to explain where it does come from.

p10materials031. Initially I collected a reasonably wide range of ribbons, tapes and yarns. The sampling during Stage 3 clearly showed that using all of them was way too busy (blogged 28-Jan-2013).

2. I pruned the proposed bindings down to just two widths of black tape, plus the spikey over-twist yarn (which I think is reminiscent of barbed wire). In the top photo step 2 shows the text stitched in bright rayon threads. I purchased some matt cotton thread in the colours of the figures’ “dress” to use on the actual piece.

3. Although I have completed the various Research Points of my current course I have continued reading, particularly on the subject of “craft”. In an essay on the genesis of “Craftivism” Betsy Greer writes about the impact of a parade she watched in Greenwich Village (1). Puppets floated along in the parade, omitting words but powerfully conveying anger and frustration on a range of issues. The tangible visual imagery seemed potent, hard to dismiss, more powerful than raised voices.

I don’t think my work really fits within Craftivism and it’s not a term I would choose for myself. However I did stop and re-evaluate my purpose and whether the use of text could weaken rather than enhance any impact of the work. For me a critical point is that the text itself does not contain the protest. Instead I am showing the words of others and the consequences of those words in practice. These words, however well-intentioned, however much based on deeply held beliefs, are trapping individuals who themselves are voiceless. The contrast of the harsh impersonal words to the experience of the voiceless individual is the whole point of the piece. So the words stay, in the hope that one day they will change.

4. Having decided to keep the words, I wondered if it would be more effective to make them less prominent. The focus should be on the trapped figure. Perhaps the nature of the trap should be less obvious, only understood at closer range and with some effort on the part of the viewer. I experimented stitching with various values of grey on the black tape, and found intriguing the darker values that looked more like texture at a distance then revealed their message when close.

Unfortunately when I did an initial trial wrapping of the final figure in the container using my prepared tapes the result was awful. The black tape was just too dominant, even when just using the narrower version. I would try a new wrapping, walk out of the room a while, come back – still ugly and uninteresting, concealing the figure way too much.

5. After some walking and pondering I decided to try organza – ribbon and torn strips of cloth. Shopping fitted into a lunch break didn’t produce many options. I couldn’t find black organza ribbon in a width that just fit the sewing machine stitched letters. The white organza looked great at first, but reflected too much when I used stronger lighting. Another problem was legibility. Using a wash-away stabiliser helped the sewing machine to form the stitches, but they distorted and became unreadable. I quite like making the viewer work a little to gain information, but I don’t want them to get frustrated and quickly turn away. Torn or handcut edges didn’t seem to fit the harsh impersonal nature of the words.

6. I tried writing by hand on the narrow black organza ribbon using a variety of pens, pencils and crayon. It was difficult to make the lettering legible. Also it felt important that the text had a impersonal machine-made look.

7. A way to print on organza ribbon was needed. Next lunchtime I was over to the art supply store where they recommended Grafix Rub-onz. On the way back to the office I remembered a very early idea about red tape – perhaps I could find red ribbon in a good width. While making a short detour to the fabric/craft store I realised that since I would be printing from the computer I could scan in my spikey yarn and use that image in the gap between printed phrases. Suddenly I was very excited.

Using the Rub-onz product is fiddly but do-able. There’s a bit of a plastic sheen from the film – but since the ribbon is organza the lettering film could show through from the back, much reducing the problem.

8. (not shown). There was quite a bit more thinking and experimenting with the extra choices now available. What font to choose? I chose Arial – bland and impersonal. All upper case, all lower or a mixture? I chose all upper – to me it looks more spikey, harsh and angular, plus there’s the idea that these phrases are being shouted out so that the individual can’t be heard. The end result also reminds me of police tape around a crime scene.

Earlier today I finished creating text on 5 metres of tape, which is now in a test wrap on the container. I look at it every now and then, wondering if I’m happy with the placement or how it could be improved.

(1) Greer, B., 2011. Craftivist History. In: M. E. Buszek, ed. Extra/Ordinary: Craft and contemporary art. Durham and London: Duke University Press, pp. 175-183.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Instagram

Germination II
In Basketry NSW Transformation exhibition Sunday 2 July. More info fibresofbeing.wordpress.com

Calendar of Posts

February 2013
M T W T F S S
« Jan   Mar »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728  

Archives

Categories


%d bloggers like this: